6 Crucial battery-saving tips for iPhone users

If you’re working out of the office or house, you never want your iPhone to run out of battery. A dead smartphone can mean missing important calls and being unable to send crucial updates to the team. But with the tips below, you can avoid these issues in the first place.

1. Activate Low Power Mode

When you switch on Low Power Mode, it automatically adjusts several settings to extend the life of your battery. For starters, it reduces the brightness of your screen and the amount of battery power your apps are using. It also disables the automatic fetching of new email and it powers off the display more quickly. To activate Low Power Mode, press Settings > Battery and then tap Low Power Mode.

2. Lower the screen brightness

The brighter your iPhone screen, the more battery it drains. To adjust your screen brightness, flick the Control Center tab upward from the bottom of your screen. There, you’ll see a horizontal line with a circle in the middle and a sun symbol to the side of both ends. Move the circle left or right to adjust the brightness.

Alternatively, you can adjust your iPhone’s brightness in Settings > Display & Brightness. On this screen, you also can turn off Auto-Brightness, which automatically adjusts the brightness of your phone. When you turn this setting off, you’ll be certain that your phone is not wasting any battery power due to excessive screen brightness.

3. Switch off Wi-Fi

Enabling Wi-Fi can be a huge battery drain depending on the location. For instance, if you’re at home, Wi-Fi will use less battery. But when you’re on the go, your phone is often searching for a Wi-Fi signal to connect to, which drains the battery. So if you can hold off on your mobile browsing and email till you get home or to the office, your phone will stay powered on longer.

4. Switch off cellular data

Like Wi-Fi, cellular data can also consume battery quickly, especially if you’re in an area where there’s no cellular coverage. When this happens, your phone begins to constantly search for a signal, and this consumes a lot of power. So if you’re short on battery and don’t need data, turn off your cellular data function. Doing this can easily provide an extra hour or two of additional battery life.

5. Activate airplane mode

Desperate times call for desperate measures, and this is exactly when you need airplane mode. If you are down to 20 percent battery life and need your phone to last for a few hours longer, airplane mode may help. By switching it on, your phone will shut down all wireless activity, including cellular, Bluetooth, and Wi-Fi.

Doing this is obviously not ideal, but if you have little battery life and want your phone available in case of emergencies, this is your best option (next to switching it off). You can also turn on wireless functions like Bluetooth or Wi-Fi individually while staying in airplane mode.

You can switch to airplane mode from the Control Center screen or by going to Settings and then clicking on Airplane mode.

6. Use a power bank

Buying a power bank to charge your phone remotely is a great option if you intend to continue using Wi-Fi, cellular data, and other high-powered settings for long hours. These devices are continually becoming lighter and smaller, so it’s no longer a hassle to carry them around. You can simply slide a power bank into your pocket and use it when needed.

If you’re looking for more ways to get the most out of your iPhone or are looking to service your Apple technology, feel free to contact us. We’re happy to help in any way possible.

This post was originally published on this site

What is juice jacking, and why is it dangerous?

Smartphones help us complete various work and personal tasks, and, depending on our usage, we may need to recharge them several times a day. But when your charger is unavailable and you need power for your phone, charging at public kiosks can seem like a good substitute. Here’s one good reason why you shouldn’t plug a public USB charger into your phone: doing so can make you a victim of a cyberattack called juice jacking.

What is juice jacking?

While newer phones can be charged wirelessly, older models still need power cords to power up their batteries. This charging method has one dangerous flaw: the cable used for charging can also be used for transferring data. Cybercriminals can exploit this flaw to commit juice jacking, or the act of using the USB data/power cable to illegitimately access phone data and/or inject malicious code into a device.

Juice jacking often happens at public charging kiosks. When you charge your phone, it is paired with a computer concealed within the charging stand. The computer can then access all of the information on your device, including personal data such as your address book, notes, photos, music, SMS database, and keyboard cache. It can even initiate a full backup of your phone, which can be accessed by the hacker wirelessly anytime.

Apart from stealing your data, cybercriminals can also inject malware into your phone through a public USB hub. All it takes is a minute of being plugged into a public charger for your phone to be infected by malware. Once infected, your phone can be prompted to display ads, download apps, or view web pages without your authorization.

How to avoid juice jacking

The most effective precaution against juice jacking is simply not charging your phone using a third-party system. Here are some tips to help you avoid using a public kiosk charger:

  • Keep your battery full. Make it a habit to charge your phone at home or at the office when you are not actively using it. When unexpected circumstances happen and you get stuck outside, your phone will have enough juice and you won’t need to charge it.
  • Carry a personal charger. External batteries like power banks have become very small and portable in recent years. Always have one in your bag so you can charge your phone securely on the go.
  • If your device has a removable battery, carry a backup battery with you anywhere. If the idea of carrying a spare battery doesn’t appeal to you, you can opt to carry a battery case instead: it’s a phone case that doubles as a battery.
  • Lock your phone. Without the proper PIN code or fingerprint and face ID scan, your phone cannot be paired with the hidden computer in the kiosk charger.
  • If you must use a third-party power source, use power-only USB cables. These cables are missing the two wires necessary for data transmission, ensuring that they can only be used for charging.

Technology threats are all around us. Even something as trivial as powering your phone in a public kiosk station can compromise your device’s security. If you want to learn more about how to protect your gadgets from today’s security threats, don’t hesitate to call us. Our technology experts are happy to help.

This post was originally published on this site

What is juice jacking, and why is it dangerous?

Smartphones help us complete various work and personal tasks, and, depending on our usage, we may need to recharge them several times a day. But when your charger is unavailable and you need power for your phone, charging at public kiosks can seem like a good substitute. Here’s one good reason why you shouldn’t plug a public USB charger into your phone: doing so can make you a victim of a cyberattack called juice jacking.

What is juice jacking?

While newer phones can be charged wirelessly, older models still need power cords to power up their batteries. This charging method has one dangerous flaw: the cable used for charging can also be used for transferring data. Cybercriminals can exploit this flaw to commit juice jacking, or the act of using the USB data/power cable to illegitimately access phone data and/or inject malicious code into a device.

Juice jacking often happens at public charging kiosks. When you charge your phone, it is paired with a computer concealed within the charging stand. The computer can then access all of the information on your device, including personal data such as your address book, notes, photos, music, SMS database, and keyboard cache. It can even initiate a full backup of your phone, which can be accessed by the hacker wirelessly anytime.

Apart from stealing your data, cybercriminals can also inject malware into your phone through a public USB hub. All it takes is a minute of being plugged into a public charger for your phone to be infected by malware. Once infected, your phone can be prompted to display ads, download apps, or view web pages without your authorization.

How to avoid juice jacking

The most effective precaution against juice jacking is simply not charging your phone using a third-party system. Here are some tips to help you avoid using a public kiosk charger:

  • Keep your battery full. Make it a habit to charge your phone at home or at the office when you are not actively using it. When unexpected circumstances happen and you get stuck outside, your phone will have enough juice and you won’t need to charge it.
  • Carry a personal charger. External batteries like power banks have become very small and portable in recent years. Always have one in your bag so you can charge your phone securely on the go.
  • If your device has a removable battery, carry a backup battery with you anywhere. If the idea of carrying a spare battery doesn’t appeal to you, you can opt to carry a battery case instead: it’s a phone case that doubles as a battery.
  • Lock your phone. Without the proper PIN code or fingerprint and face ID scan, your phone cannot be paired with the hidden computer in the kiosk charger.
  • If you must use a third-party power source, use power-only USB cables. These cables are missing the two wires necessary for data transmission, ensuring that they can only be used for charging.

Technology threats are all around us. Even something as trivial as powering your phone in a public kiosk station can compromise your device’s security. If you want to learn more about how to protect your gadgets from today’s security threats, don’t hesitate to call us. Our technology experts are happy to help.

This post was originally published on this site