How do sites with HTTPS make web browsing secure?

If you shop online like many people, you need to make sure that the site’s payment page has HTTPS in its URL. Otherwise, entering your personal and financial information on this page can expose you to risks such as identity theft. Read on to find out why HTTPS makes for a safer online browsing experience.

HTTPS encryption

The “S” in HTTPS stands for “secured.” It was introduced in 1995, so older websites that have been left on their own without regular maintenance usually don’t have it. But even to this day, unsecure websites exist, and fraudsters can easily take advantage of them.

When you visit a site with an HTTP connection, everything you type or click on that website is sent without encryption. This means that anyone who intercepts the data transferred between the website and your computer can view them as is. Cybercriminals know this, and they can exploit this fact to gain access to your Social Security number, credit card information, and other personal data. This puts you at risk of identity theft and other fraudulent activities.

HTTPS certificates

When you visit a website, your computer uses an online directory to translate its alphanumeric name into a numerical address. It then saves that information on your computer so that it doesn’t have to check the online directory every time you visit the same website.

In case your computer gets compromised, it could be manipulated into directing a perfectly safe web address like www.google.com to a malicious website. Most of the time, users are sent to sites that look exactly like the legitimate site but are actually fake copies designed to trick them into divulging their credentials.

To prevent such incidents from happening, the online directories mentioned earlier issue an ecosystem of certificates that turn HTTP into HTTPS, making it impossible for anyone to be redirected to a fraudulent website.

How does this affect our daily browsing habits?

We often visit a multitude of websites in a short period of time without checking each one for padlocks and certificates. Unfortunately, we can’t ignore the importance of HTTPS, so here are a few things to consider the next time you browse the internet:

  • If your browser marks a website as “unsafe,” think twice about clicking “Proceed anyway.” Click the prompt only if you are absolutely certain no confidential data will be transmitted.
  • Add web browser extensions such as HTTPS Everywhere that create encrypted connections to unencrypted websites. These extensions encrypt your communication with websites and are compatible with Chrome, Firefox, and Edge browsers.
  • Always be vigilant. Some sites may have HTTPS, but it doesn’t mean they’re safe. For example, goog1e.com (with the “l” replaced with a one) could have a certificate, but the misspelling clearly indicates that it’s an untrustworthy site. Cybercriminals use similar spellings of authentic websites to fool people into thinking that they’re on a secure site. This is called typosquatting or URL hijacking.
  • And perhaps, just follow the easiest step of all: avoid sites that don’t use the HTTPS prefix.

If you want to learn more about safer browsing habits and endpoint security, give our office a call.

This post was originally published on this site

How do sites with HTTPS make web browsing secure?

If you shop online like many people, you need to make sure that the site’s payment page has HTTPS in its URL. Otherwise, entering your personal and financial information on this page can expose you to risks such as identity theft. Read on to find out why HTTPS makes for a safer online browsing experience.

HTTPS encryption

The “S” in HTTPS stands for “secured.” It was introduced in 1995, so older websites that have been left on their own without regular maintenance usually don’t have it. But even to this day, unsecure websites exist, and fraudsters can easily take advantage of them.

When you visit a site with an HTTP connection, everything you type or click on that website is sent without encryption. This means that anyone who intercepts the data transferred between the website and your computer can view them as is. Cybercriminals know this, and they can exploit this fact to gain access to your Social Security number, credit card information, and other personal data. This puts you at risk of identity theft and other fraudulent activities.

HTTPS certificates

When you visit a website, your computer uses an online directory to translate its alphanumeric name into a numerical address. It then saves that information on your computer so that it doesn’t have to check the online directory every time you visit the same website.

In case your computer gets compromised, it could be manipulated into directing a perfectly safe web address like www.google.com to a malicious website. Most of the time, users are sent to sites that look exactly like the legitimate site but are actually fake copies designed to trick them into divulging their credentials.

To prevent such incidents from happening, the online directories mentioned earlier issue an ecosystem of certificates that turn HTTP into HTTPS, making it impossible for anyone to be redirected to a fraudulent website.

How does this affect our daily browsing habits?

We often visit a multitude of websites in a short period of time without checking each one for padlocks and certificates. Unfortunately, we can’t ignore the importance of HTTPS, so here are a few things to consider the next time you browse the internet:

  • If your browser marks a website as “unsafe,” think twice about clicking “Proceed anyway.” Click the prompt only if you are absolutely certain no confidential data will be transmitted.
  • Add web browser extensions such as HTTPS Everywhere that create encrypted connections to unencrypted websites. These extensions encrypt your communication with websites and are compatible with Chrome, Firefox, and Edge browsers.
  • Always be vigilant. Some sites may have HTTPS, but it doesn’t mean they’re safe. For example, goog1e.com (with the “l” replaced with a one) could have a certificate, but the misspelling clearly indicates that it’s an untrustworthy site. Cybercriminals use similar spellings of authentic websites to fool people into thinking that they’re on a secure site. This is called typosquatting or URL hijacking.
  • And perhaps, just follow the easiest step of all: avoid sites that don’t use the HTTPS prefix.

If you want to learn more about safer browsing habits and endpoint security, give our office a call.

This post was originally published on this site

3 Simple tips for thwarting cybercriminals

Advances in technology have made life easier but have also enabled cybercriminals to improve their techniques. This can be a big blow to small-business owners who often take data security for granted. To keep your business safe, follow these simple tips.

Cover your webcam

If Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, former FBI Director James Comey, and National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden all believe their webcams could be compromised, there’s no reason you should feel safe. This is because cybercriminals can use your webcam to spy on you.

They can examine your surroundings, determine your location, and spy on the people you’re with. The attackers can record intimate and vulnerable moments and use these to blackmail you.

Fortunately, guarding yourself against this danger is easy. Covering your webcam should do the trick. You can use regular tape or you can purchase a cheap webcam cover online. Check as well if your webcam has a dedicated kill switch, as this disables the hardware, making it impossible for cybercriminals to spy on you.

Use a privacy shield

Also known as a privacy guard, screen, and filter, a privacy shield is a thin transparent sheet you apply on your computer, laptop, or smartphone screen to limit viewing angles. Once installed, anyone trying to look at your screen from anywhere — except straight on — will see nothing.

Privacy filters are commonly used to protect work devices that display or contain critical files with sensitive data or confidential information. However, work and personal devices are both vulnerable to “shoulder surfing,” the act of peeking at someone else’s screen, with or without ill intent. This is why it’s ideal to use protectors on all the devices you and your staff use.

Get a physical/biometric authentication key

Requiring more than one set of credentials to access sensitive resources has become the standard practice for established websites and applications. With multifactor authentication (MFA) in place, you can gain access to your account only after you’ve entered an authentication code.

Before, two-factor authentication relied mostly on text messages sent to mobile phones. But IT experts now discourage the use of SMS authentication because of the following reasons:

  • Text messages aren’t encrypted (i.e., these can be seen in plain text), and can be intercepted in man-in-the-middle attacks.
  • Text message notifications may display one-time pins (OTPs) that can be seen by unintended viewers.
  • Cybercriminals may redirect text messages to their own devices.
  • OTPs can be stolen via SIM swapping.
  • Users can be tricked into entering OTPs in a fraudulent login page.

If you’re looking for authentication services that can’t be easily neutralized, try a hardware key like a USB or Bluetooth key that you can always carry around. You can also use biometrics such as a fingerprint, retina, or facial scan. It’s difficult to copy a person’s fingerprint or facial features, making it a secure authentication method.

If you need help setting up two-factor authentication or IT security services, contact our experts. We’ll help you get peace of mind from knowing that your business IT is in good hands.

This post was originally published on this site

3 Simple tips for thwarting cybercriminals

Advances in technology have made life easier but have also enabled cybercriminals to improve their techniques. This can be a big blow to small-business owners who often take data security for granted. To keep your business safe, follow these simple tips.

Cover your webcam

If Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, former FBI Director James Comey, and National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden all believe their webcams could be compromised, there’s no reason you should feel safe. This is because cybercriminals can use your webcam to spy on you.

They can examine your surroundings, determine your location, and spy on the people you’re with. The attackers can record intimate and vulnerable moments and use these to blackmail you.

Fortunately, guarding yourself against this danger is easy. Covering your webcam should do the trick. You can use regular tape or you can purchase a cheap webcam cover online. Check as well if your webcam has a dedicated kill switch, as this disables the hardware, making it impossible for cybercriminals to spy on you.

Use a privacy shield

Also known as a privacy guard, screen, and filter, a privacy shield is a thin transparent sheet you apply on your computer, laptop, or smartphone screen to limit viewing angles. Once installed, anyone trying to look at your screen from anywhere — except straight on — will see nothing.

Privacy filters are commonly used to protect work devices that display or contain critical files with sensitive data or confidential information. However, work and personal devices are both vulnerable to “shoulder surfing,” the act of peeking at someone else’s screen, with or without ill intent. This is why it’s ideal to use protectors on all the devices you and your staff use.

Get a physical/biometric authentication key

Requiring more than one set of credentials to access sensitive resources has become the standard practice for established websites and applications. With multifactor authentication (MFA) in place, you can gain access to your account only after you’ve entered an authentication code.

Before, two-factor authentication relied mostly on text messages sent to mobile phones. But IT experts now discourage the use of SMS authentication because of the following reasons:

  • Text messages aren’t encrypted (i.e., these can be seen in plain text), and can be intercepted in man-in-the-middle attacks.
  • Text message notifications may display one-time pins (OTPs) that can be seen by unintended viewers.
  • Cybercriminals may redirect text messages to their own devices.
  • OTPs can be stolen via SIM swapping.
  • Users can be tricked into entering OTPs in a fraudulent login page.

If you’re looking for authentication services that can’t be easily neutralized, try a hardware key like a USB or Bluetooth key that you can always carry around. You can also use biometrics such as a fingerprint, retina, or facial scan. It’s difficult to copy a person’s fingerprint or facial features, making it a secure authentication method.

If you need help setting up two-factor authentication or IT security services, contact our experts. We’ll help you get peace of mind from knowing that your business IT is in good hands.

This post was originally published on this site

Stop insider threats within healthcare organizations

Insider threats are anyone within your organization who has knowledge of your computer systems and who can expose your data. They can be any of your current or former associates, contractors, or employees. Insider threats are a major risk to any company, including those in the healthcare sector. Let’s take a look at five ways through which you can protect your healthcare company’s data from breaches and loss caused by them.

Educate

All healthcare employees must be educated on patient privacy, data security, and the risks associated with certain behaviors. They must also be aware of allowable uses and disclosures of protected health information (PHI). For example, some healthcare personnel may be tempted to peek into the medical records of a celebrity admitted to their hospital. You must emphasize that such behavior is strictly forbidden and that it carries corresponding penalties.

Deter

Develop and enforce policies aimed at reducing the risk of data leaks. Make sure your employees understand the repercussions of violations and privacy breaches under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. Discussing patients or PHI in public areas of the hospital, for example, can result in hefty penalties and criminal charges leading to jail time.

Detect

Healthcare organizations should implement technology that can quickly identify breaches. They also need to ensure that only authorized personnel are accessing sensitive patient data. This can be accomplished by regularly checking user access logs, as well as consistently monitoring and updating access controls. Any attempt by unauthorized personnel to access data must be penalized.

Investigate

To limit its impact, any potential privacy and security breach must be investigated promptly and thoroughly upon detection. Once the cause of the breach is identified, your organization needs to implement measures to keep breaches from happening in the future.

Train

Healthcare employees must regularly undergo comprehensive cybersecurity training, as this will turn them into an effective first line of defense against various cyber risks, including insider threats. Just because the members of your team were oriented on data privacy and security-related topics during their first day on the job doesn’t mean you should be complacent. Cybersecurity risks continue to evolve, so it pays to be vigilant and to keep your team’s knowledge updated at all times.

Encourage your IT department to provide various tips across a wide variety of cybersecurity-related topics throughout the year. Using different types of media, such as emails, printed newsletters, infographics, and even memos, to deliver these tips will make them easier to understand and keep in mind for your employees.

Protecting healthcare data from insider threats is more than just about staying compliant with industry regulations. It’s also vital to protecting the privacy of your patients and your staff, as well as the reputation of your healthcare organization.

For more information about the different ways you can keep your healthcare data secure, just give our experts a call.

This post was originally published on this site

Stop insider threats within healthcare organizations

Insider threats are anyone within your organization who has knowledge of your computer systems and who can expose your data. They can be any of your current or former associates, contractors, or employees. Insider threats are a major risk to any company, including those in the healthcare sector. Let’s take a look at five ways through which you can protect your healthcare company’s data from breaches and loss caused by them.

Educate

All healthcare employees must be educated on patient privacy, data security, and the risks associated with certain behaviors. They must also be aware of allowable uses and disclosures of protected health information (PHI). For example, some healthcare personnel may be tempted to peek into the medical records of a celebrity admitted to their hospital. You must emphasize that such behavior is strictly forbidden and that it carries corresponding penalties.

Deter

Develop and enforce policies aimed at reducing the risk of data leaks. Make sure your employees understand the repercussions of violations and privacy breaches under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. Discussing patients or PHI in public areas of the hospital, for example, can result in hefty penalties and criminal charges leading to jail time.

Detect

Healthcare organizations should implement technology that can quickly identify breaches. They also need to ensure that only authorized personnel are accessing sensitive patient data. This can be accomplished by regularly checking user access logs, as well as consistently monitoring and updating access controls. Any attempt by unauthorized personnel to access data must be penalized.

Investigate

To limit its impact, any potential privacy and security breach must be investigated promptly and thoroughly upon detection. Once the cause of the breach is identified, your organization needs to implement measures to keep breaches from happening in the future.

Train

Healthcare employees must regularly undergo comprehensive cybersecurity training, as this will turn them into an effective first line of defense against various cyber risks, including insider threats. Just because the members of your team were oriented on data privacy and security-related topics during their first day on the job doesn’t mean you should be complacent. Cybersecurity risks continue to evolve, so it pays to be vigilant and to keep your team’s knowledge updated at all times.

Encourage your IT department to provide various tips across a wide variety of cybersecurity-related topics throughout the year. Using different types of media, such as emails, printed newsletters, infographics, and even memos, to deliver these tips will make them easier to understand and keep in mind for your employees.

Protecting healthcare data from insider threats is more than just about staying compliant with industry regulations. It’s also vital to protecting the privacy of your patients and your staff, as well as the reputation of your healthcare organization.

For more information about the different ways you can keep your healthcare data secure, just give our experts a call.

This post was originally published on this site

Basic cybersecurity terms everyone should know

If the only cybersecurity terms you know are “virus” and “hacking,” now is the time to expand your cybersecurity vocabulary. This will enable you to better understand the variety of risks in the online world and protect your computers, data, and yourself. Here’s a short yet handy list of cybersecurity terms you should know.

Malware

For a long time, the phrase “computer virus” was misused to refer to every type of attack that intended to harm or hurt computers and networks. The more appropriate term for these harmful programs and files would be “malicious software” or “malware.” Whereas a virus is a specific type of malware that is designed to replicate itself, any software created for the purpose of destroying or unfairly accessing networks and data should be referred to as malware.

Ransomware

Don’t let all other cyberthreats ending in -ware confuse you; they are all just subcategories of malware. Currently, one of the most popular of these is “ransomware,” which is malware that encrypts valuable data until a ransom is paid.

Intrusion prevention system (IPS)

There are several ways to safeguard your network from malware, but an IPS is quickly becoming one of the nonnegotiables. An IPS sits inside your company’s firewall and looks for suspicious and malicious activity that can be halted before it can exploit or take advantage of a known vulnerability.

Social engineering

Not all types of malware rely solely on fancy computer programming. Experts agree that the majority of attacks require some form of “social engineering” to succeed. Social engineering is the act of tricking people, rather than computers, into revealing sensitive or protected information. For cybercriminals, complicated software is totally unnecessary if they can just convince potential victims that they’re a security professional who needs the victims’ password to secure their account.

Phishing

Despite often relying on face-to-face interactions, social engineering does occasionally employ more technical methods. Phishing is the act of defrauding people using an app or a website that impersonates a trustworthy or often well-known business in an attempt to obtain confidential information. Just because you received an email that says it’s from the IRS doesn’t mean that it is. Don’t take such emails at face value — always verify the source, especially if the emails are requesting your sensitive data.

Antivirus

Antivirus software is often misunderstood as a way to comprehensively secure your computers and workstations. These applications are just one piece of the cybersecurity puzzle and can only scan the drives on which they are installed for signs of well-known malware variants.

Zero-day attacks

Malware is most dangerous when it has been released but not yet discovered by cybersecurity experts. When a vulnerability is found within a piece of software, vendors will release an update to fix the gap in security. However, if cyberattackers release a piece of malware that has never been seen before, and if that malware exploits one of these holes before the vulnerability is addressed, it is called a zero-day attack.

Patch

When software developers discover a security vulnerability in their programming, they usually release a small file to update and “patch” this gap. Patches are essential to keeping your network secure from the vultures lurking on the internet. By checking for and installing patches as often as possible, you keep your software protected from the latest malware.

Redundant data

When antivirus software, patches, and intrusion prevention fail to keep your information secure, there’s only one thing that will: quarantined off-site storage. Duplicating your data offline and storing it somewhere other than your business’s workspace ensures that if there is a malware infection, you’re equipped with backups.

Our cybersecurity professionals are always available to impart more in-depth knowledge of the many different kinds of cyberthreats. Get in touch with us today and find out how we can help you with your IT security woes.

This post was originally published on this site

Basic cybersecurity terms everyone should know

If the only cybersecurity terms you know are “virus” and “hacking,” now is the time to expand your cybersecurity vocabulary. This will enable you to better understand the variety of risks in the online world and protect your computers, data, and yourself. Here’s a short yet handy list of cybersecurity terms you should know.

Malware

For a long time, the phrase “computer virus” was misused to refer to every type of attack that intended to harm or hurt computers and networks. The more appropriate term for these harmful programs and files would be “malicious software” or “malware.” Whereas a virus is a specific type of malware that is designed to replicate itself, any software created for the purpose of destroying or unfairly accessing networks and data should be referred to as malware.

Ransomware

Don’t let all other cyberthreats ending in -ware confuse you; they are all just subcategories of malware. Currently, one of the most popular of these is “ransomware,” which is malware that encrypts valuable data until a ransom is paid.

Intrusion prevention system (IPS)

There are several ways to safeguard your network from malware, but an IPS is quickly becoming one of the nonnegotiables. An IPS sits inside your company’s firewall and looks for suspicious and malicious activity that can be halted before it can exploit or take advantage of a known vulnerability.

Social engineering

Not all types of malware rely solely on fancy computer programming. Experts agree that the majority of attacks require some form of “social engineering” to succeed. Social engineering is the act of tricking people, rather than computers, into revealing sensitive or protected information. For cybercriminals, complicated software is totally unnecessary if they can just convince potential victims that they’re a security professional who needs the victims’ password to secure their account.

Phishing

Despite often relying on face-to-face interactions, social engineering does occasionally employ more technical methods. Phishing is the act of defrauding people using an app or a website that impersonates a trustworthy or often well-known business in an attempt to obtain confidential information. Just because you received an email that says it’s from the IRS doesn’t mean that it is. Don’t take such emails at face value — always verify the source, especially if the emails are requesting your sensitive data.

Antivirus

Antivirus software is often misunderstood as a way to comprehensively secure your computers and workstations. These applications are just one piece of the cybersecurity puzzle and can only scan the drives on which they are installed for signs of well-known malware variants.

Zero-day attacks

Malware is most dangerous when it has been released but not yet discovered by cybersecurity experts. When a vulnerability is found within a piece of software, vendors will release an update to fix the gap in security. However, if cyberattackers release a piece of malware that has never been seen before, and if that malware exploits one of these holes before the vulnerability is addressed, it is called a zero-day attack.

Patch

When software developers discover a security vulnerability in their programming, they usually release a small file to update and “patch” this gap. Patches are essential to keeping your network secure from the vultures lurking on the internet. By checking for and installing patches as often as possible, you keep your software protected from the latest malware.

Redundant data

When antivirus software, patches, and intrusion prevention fail to keep your information secure, there’s only one thing that will: quarantined off-site storage. Duplicating your data offline and storing it somewhere other than your business’s workspace ensures that if there is a malware infection, you’re equipped with backups.

Our cybersecurity professionals are always available to impart more in-depth knowledge of the many different kinds of cyberthreats. Get in touch with us today and find out how we can help you with your IT security woes.

This post was originally published on this site

How to mitigate Microsoft 365 security risks

Microsoft 365 has transformed the way many organizations work by enhancing workflows, collaboration, and efficiency. But like other cloud-based solutions, this line of subscription services is not immune to security risks. Here’s what your business can do to address these challenges.

Vulnerabilities in SharePoint

Businesses typically use SharePoint Online and on-premises SharePoint sites to store sensitive information like personally identifiable data. Failing to secure SharePoint content against unauthorized users is one way to expose data and your business to malicious actors. This can be critical for companies that are required to comply with stringent data privacy and protection regulations and may face serious consequences for noncompliance.

To prevent this, limit administrator-level privileges and enable encryption. Additionally, set the necessary security restrictions per user for every application.

Unprotected communication channels

Phishing attacks and malware are two of the most common ways cybercriminals infiltrate a system, but there are other paths of attack. Microsoft 365 applications like Microsoft Teams, which can connect to external networks, may serve as a medium for ransomware and other types of attack.

Train your staff to identify potentially malicious files and links. Also, offer guidelines on how to handle and route sensitive files and communication to safe locations.

Security risks in dormant applications

Organizations using Microsoft 365 often won’t use all the tools and services included in the productivity suite. You may use one or several programs like Word, Excel, and SharePoint but rarely use OneDrive. If your business has been utilizing specific programs, note that some dormant applications may be prone to attack. This is why it’s crucial to identify the apps that aren’t being used, and have an administrator tweak user settings to restrict availability on such apps.

File synchronization

Like most cloud services, Microsoft 365 allows users to automatically sync on-premises files to the cloud, such as in OneDrive. This useful feature is not without security risks, however. If a file stored locally is infected with malware, OneDrive will view the file as changed/updated and trigger a sync to the OneDrive cloud, with the infection going undetected.

Office 365 Cloud App Security, a subset of Microsoft Cloud App Security, is designed to enhance protections for Office 365 apps and provide great visibility into user activity to improve incident response efforts. Make sure your organization’s security administrators set it up on your systems so you can detect and mitigate cyber risks as soon as possible.

Cybercriminals will continue to sharpen their hacking techniques, and your organization must keep up to protect your systems, apps, and devices. Call our team of IT experts now if you want to strengthen your business IT security.

This post was originally published on this site

How to mitigate Microsoft 365 security risks

Microsoft 365 has transformed the way many organizations work by enhancing workflows, collaboration, and efficiency. But like other cloud-based solutions, this line of subscription services is not immune to security risks. Here’s what your business can do to address these challenges.

Vulnerabilities in SharePoint

Businesses typically use SharePoint Online and on-premises SharePoint sites to store sensitive information like personally identifiable data. Failing to secure SharePoint content against unauthorized users is one way to expose data and your business to malicious actors. This can be critical for companies that are required to comply with stringent data privacy and protection regulations and may face serious consequences for noncompliance.

To prevent this, limit administrator-level privileges and enable encryption. Additionally, set the necessary security restrictions per user for every application.

Unprotected communication channels

Phishing attacks and malware are two of the most common ways cybercriminals infiltrate a system, but there are other paths of attack. Microsoft 365 applications like Microsoft Teams, which can connect to external networks, may serve as a medium for ransomware and other types of attack.

Train your staff to identify potentially malicious files and links. Also, offer guidelines on how to handle and route sensitive files and communication to safe locations.

Security risks in dormant applications

Organizations using Microsoft 365 often won’t use all the tools and services included in the productivity suite. You may use one or several programs like Word, Excel, and SharePoint but rarely use OneDrive. If your business has been utilizing specific programs, note that some dormant applications may be prone to attack. This is why it’s crucial to identify the apps that aren’t being used, and have an administrator tweak user settings to restrict availability on such apps.

File synchronization

Like most cloud services, Microsoft 365 allows users to automatically sync on-premises files to the cloud, such as in OneDrive. This useful feature is not without security risks, however. If a file stored locally is infected with malware, OneDrive will view the file as changed/updated and trigger a sync to the OneDrive cloud, with the infection going undetected.

Office 365 Cloud App Security, a subset of Microsoft Cloud App Security, is designed to enhance protections for Office 365 apps and provide great visibility into user activity to improve incident response efforts. Make sure your organization’s security administrators set it up on your systems so you can detect and mitigate cyber risks as soon as possible.

Cybercriminals will continue to sharpen their hacking techniques, and your organization must keep up to protect your systems, apps, and devices. Call our team of IT experts now if you want to strengthen your business IT security.

This post was originally published on this site