The crucial role of MSPs in SMB cybersecurity

With modern cyberattacks targeting companies of all sizes, businesses cannot afford to relegate cybersecurity to the bottom of their list of priorities. When it comes to cybersecurity, even small- and mid-sized businesses (SMBs) would do well to get help from an expert. Here’s how having a managed IT services provider (MSP) implement robust cybersecurity solutions for you will benefit your business.

The numbers

Through the years, the number of SMBs falling victim to cyberattacks has drastically increased. Ransomware attacks, misconfigured systems, credential stuffing, and social engineering are among the many cyberthreats that SMBs face. Also, according to Verizon’s 2021 Data Breach Investigations Report, one in every five data breach victims was an SMB. What’s more, only 47% of SMBs are able to detect breaches within days.

The financial consequences have also considerably increased. IBM’s Cost of a Data Breach Report 2021 shows that “data breach costs rose from USD 3.86 million to USD 4.24 million.”

The numbers don’t lie, so it’s only about time SMBs take cybersecurity seriously. You can safeguard your business from cyberattacks and provide a more secure customer experience by working with a trusted MSP.

Why managed services?

Partnering with MSPs is the most effective way to prevent attacks and defend against malicious threats. MSPs offer a full range of proactive IT support that focuses on advanced security, such as around-the-clock monitoring, data encryption and backup, real-time threat prevention and elimination, network and firewall protection, security awareness training, and more. Here are some of the services an MSP can offer:

    • Around-the-clock monitoring – A cyberattack can happen at any moment. By having someone watching your networks and systems 24/7, MSPs ensure that any potential threats are identified and dealt with quickly.
    • Data encryption and backup – Data encryption transforms readable data into an unreadable format. This can be done through the use of a key, which is only accessible to authorized users. This way, even if the data is compromised, it can’t be read without the key. Meanwhile, data backup is the process of creating and preserving copies of data so that it can be restored in the event of data loss.
    • Real-time threat prevention and elimination – By using technology that can detect and stop threats as they happen, this security solution can minimize the impact of an attack and keep your business data safe.
    • Network and firewall protection – Networks and firewalls create a barrier between the business network and the internet, securing confidential data, such as customer information, employee records, and trade secrets. Networks can be configured to allow certain types of traffic through while blocking others, so that only authorized users can access specific resources.
    • Security awareness training – Now, more than ever, SMBs need to be aware of cybersecurity threats and how to protect themselves. MSPs can facilitate security awareness training that can help employees spot red flags and know what to do (and not do) to keep company data safe.

Managed IT services are designed to identify and fix weak spots in your IT infrastructure, enabling you to optimize the digital backbone of your business processes. With managed IT, you’ll also have faster network performance, a solid business continuity and disaster recovery strategy, and minimal downtime. You’ll also get a dedicated team of IT professionals ready to assist you with any technology-related problems. This is much more effective and budget-friendly than having in-house personnel juggling all of your business IT needs.

Being proactive when it comes to cybersecurity is the only way to protect what you’ve worked hard to build. If you’d like to know more about how managed services can benefit your business, just give us a call — we’re sure to help.

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Fileless malware: The invisible threat

Hackers have found a clever way to get around anti-malware software — they’re using fileless malware, a type of malicious software that’s not as visible as traditional malware. This means it can infect your entire infrastructure without you even knowing. Let’s take a closer look at how fileless malware works and what you can do to defend against it.

What is fileless malware?

Fileless malware is malicious software that doesn’t rely on executable files to infect your infrastructure. Rather, it hides in your computer’s random access memory and uses trusted, legitimate processes, such as Microsoft Office macros, PowerShell, and Windows Management Instrumentation.

Fileless malware isn’t as visible as traditional malware. It uses a variety of techniques to stay persistent and can adversely affect the integrity of a business’s processes and the infrastructures that run them. Because there are no files to trace, fileless malware escapes detection by most anti-malware programs, especially those that use the databases of known threats. Most automated sensors cannot recognize illicit scripts, and cybersecurity analysts who are trained to identify them usually have a hard time determining where to look.

What potential damage can fileless malware do?

If it is not detected and removed, fileless malware can do a lot of damage to business systems, such as:

  • Steal or destroy data
  • Modify files without authorization
  • Act as a backdoor for other types of malware
  • Cause system crashes and instability
  • Disrupt normal operations by taking up CPU time or memory

Examples of high-profile fileless malware attacks include the Democratic National Committee hacking in 2016 and the Equifax data breach in 2017.

How big of a threat is fileless malware?

Cybersecurity provider WatchGuard Technologies’s Internet Security Report for Q4 2020 found that fileless malware attacks during the year jumped by 888% from 2019. Worse still, their Q2 2021 report revealed that just halfway through 2021, the number of fileless malware detections originating from scripting engines like PowerShell was already at 80% of 2020’s total script-initiated attack volume.

How can you defend against fileless malware?

Your business should practice defense in depth in which you implement multiple safeguards to reduce exposure and mitigate damage. Such safeguards include keeping your systems updated, limiting user access rights and privileges, cultivating a security-aware workforce, and utilizing advanced security solutions that analyze behavioral trends. Lastly, you should also partner with a managed IT services provider that offers 24/7 network monitoring, security audit, and penetration testing. Call us today to get started.

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The risks of password autofill

Hackers may have found an effective way to track users using a web browser or password manager’s password autofill feature. Here’s how they do it and what you can do to protect yourself.

Why password autofill is so dangerous

Modern web browsers and password managers have a feature that enables usernames and passwords to be automatically entered into a web form. This feature isn’t completely safe, however. If you enable this feature and hackers gain access to your computer or web browser, it will be easier for them to infiltrate your accounts because the autocomplete feature will fill in all saved credentials.

Tricking a browser or password manager into providing saved information is incredibly simple. All a threat actor needs to do is place an invisible form on a compromised webpage to collect users’ login information. Once the browser or password manager enters the user’s information, the hacker will gain access to that data.

Using autofill to track users

Shrewd digital marketers can also use password autofill to track user activity. For instance, they can track people based on the usernames in hidden autofill forms they place on websites and sell the information they gather to advertisers. While they don’t intend to steal passwords, there’s always the likelihood of exposure.

One simple security tip

A quick and effective way to improve your account security is to turn off autofill. Here’s how to do it:

  • On Microsoft Edge – Open the Settings window, click Profiles, and then select Passwords. Disable “Offer to save passwords.”
  • On Google Chrome – Open the Settings window, click Autofill, and disable “Offer to save passwords.”
  • On Firefox – Open the Settings window, then click Privacy & Security. Under the Logins and Passwords heading, untick the box next to “Autofill logins and passwords.”
  • On Safari – Open the Preferences window, select the Auto-fill tab, and turn off all the features related to usernames and passwords.

Having good password security habits can significantly protect your sensitive data. For 24/7 cybersecurity support that goes far beyond protecting your privacy, call us today.

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Why is Windows 11’s TPM requirement important?

Months before Windows 11’s official release date, conversations were already focused not just on the new operating system’s (OS) new features, but also on how its hardware requirements compared to its predecessor’s. Among the points raised was the compulsory Trusted Platform Module (TPM) 2.0 chip in Windows 11-supported devices — a marked upgrade from Windows 10’s TPM 1.2 requirement. Now, better hardware generally costs more, so it won’t be surprising if you’re looking for ways around this particular requirement in order to save money. In this post, we discuss why you shouldn’t do that.

What is a TPM chip anyway?

A TPM is a security chip embedded in modern systems that provides a hardware-based tamper-resistant environment to generate, store, and protect encryption keys. Commonly found in the latest smartphones and PCs, these chips supply the cryptographic key that unlocks your machine and permits you to access your data. Should a hacker or any unauthorized party gain access to your device and try to tamper with your encrypted drives, then the chip will prevent the device from booting up.

TPMs are also used by some apps and web services. For instance, Outlook uses a TPM for handling encrypted emails. Web browsers, on the other hand, utilize it for maintaining SSL certificates used to authenticate and create encrypted connections with websites.

Why shouldn’t you circumvent Windows 11’s TPM requirement?

Some users felt that requiring TPM 2.0 on devices running Windows 11 was too restrictive. From their point of view, Windows 10 ran with just TPM 1.2 and it has remained fairly secure. As such, some users have been searching for ways to run Microsoft’s newest OS even on devices without the required TPM 2.0 chip. But even if such methods are eventually found, here’s why you’d be wise to avoid them:

TPM 2.0 is more advanced than TPM 1.2
As is the case with most types of tech, iterations with higher numbers aren’t just newer, but they come with better features too. In particular, TPM 2.0 supports more and newer cryptographic algorithms than its predecessors. This means it can generate keys that are harder to break, making devices that use it more difficult for hackers to infiltrate.

Compatibility issues may arise
Like any software manufacturer worth their salt, Microsoft tested Windows 11 extensively prior to the product’s release and they very likely did so on supported devices. Therefore, running the new OS on devices that don’t meet hardware specifications may result in compatibility issues that can lead to various problems, ranging from glitches to outright failure. In any case, addressing these issues may prove to be more expensive than investing in supported hardware from the get-go.

Microsoft won’t release updates for unsupported devices
The software giant temporarily relaxed some of its restrictions and allowed unsupported devices to run Windows 11 for some time. They made it clear, however, that unsupported devices won’t be receiving any future updates.

Updates are extremely crucial. Apart from helping improve user experience through new features and quality-of-life upgrades, updates also bolster your OS’s defenses against the most recent threats. Not receiving future updates will leave your IT systems and your business vulnerable to cyberattacks.

When it comes to bypassing Windows 11’s hardware requirements, especially if these have something to do with security, just remember this adage: “Just because you can, doesn’t mean you should.” If you have any other questions about Windows 11 and how you can make the most out of its features, just give us a call.

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Bolster your mobile security with MTD

Malware attacks are continuously on the rise. In 2019, cybersecurity experts calculated that one organization succumbed to a malware attack every 14 seconds. In 2021, that figure rose to one malware victim per 11 seconds. For this reason, businesses must implement a mobile-first security strategy. Leveraging mobile threat detection (MTD) solutions is an excellent way to accomplish that.

MTD and malware detection

Mobile threat detection solutions prevent network-based attacks and malware infections on mobile devices such as smartphones, tablets, and laptops. Since most malware programs are cleverly disguised as legitimate apps, the key to finding and defending against them is to recognize irregular patterns in user behavior and device function — something that MTD tools excel at.

When applied to business networks, MTD solutions can monitor network traffic for suspicious activity, such as invalid or spoofed certificates, in order to stop man-in-the-middle attacks. This enables them to respond to threats in real time while providing insight on the risk level of all devices connected to the network.

MTD and machine learning

All MTD tools are supported by a machine learning mechanism, which allows them to recognize usage patterns and flag any behavioral outliers. MTD solutions are also very scalable, and they are able to monitor dozens of Android mobile devices simultaneously. When one of these devices starts functioning in a way that deviates from the rest, machine learning helps the MTD tool log the anomaly and notify IT administrators.

Implementing an MTD solution

Integrating an MTD solution into your mobile security strategy requires a thorough evaluation of various critical factors, including industry regulations and the sensitivity of the data stored and/or exchanged on your mobile devices. Ideally, your MTD solution should be part of a larger security strategy that allows you to block harmful network traffic and strengthen the business’s overall cybersecurity posture.

Developing strong defenses for mobile devices is fast becoming a critical component in many businesses’ cybersecurity strategies. And although mobile threat detection remains an imperfect means to detect malware, it is far more powerful than traditional anti-malware solutions.

Other benefits of using MTD tools

Rolling out an MTD solution comes with several benefits essential to today’s remote or hybrid work environments. For one, it gives a company confidence in implementing a bring your own device policy. Not only is an MTD solution able to thwart cyberattacks before they become serious problems, it also gives IT administrators critical visibility into the risk level of the company’s mobile workforce. What’s more, deploying MTD solutions makes regulatory compliance a breeze, as it ensures that the organization’s sensitive data is safe regardless of where it’s stored.

Businesses like yours need comprehensive security solutions to fend off cyberattacks, whether on your PCs, laptops, or smartphones. For expert IT security recommendations, call our experts today.

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Keep cybercriminals from attacking your business printers with these tips

It’s easy to overlook printers when implementing a cybersecurity strategy, as they may seem safe from cyberattacks. But in reality, many hackers these days exploit certain printer vulnerabilities to gather information about businesses or even infiltrate their systems without anyone noticing. Protect your business printers by following these tips.

What makes business printers vulnerable to cyberattacks?

When assessing network security threats, companies primarily focus on servers and computers not only because these are the most exposed to external threats, but also because they get the bulk of cyberattacks. Printers are often at the bottom of the list since they are not prime targets. What’s more, their functions seem to be internal at first glance, as they don’t interact with external systems.

But it’s exactly because of their primary functions, namely printing and scanning, that make print devices perfect cybercriminal targets. Businesses run important documents such as tax forms, employee information, medical records, and financial statements through print devices — information that hackers would definitely love to get their hands on.

And they can, easily.

Network printers store previous print jobs in their hard drive, sometimes including those that have been canceled. If anyone accesses the printer — even remotely — they may be able to see those documents by hacking into the printer using a specialized tool.

Files can also be intercepted during wireless transmission, as modern printers can now be connected to the web. Not only can hackers exploit printers’ open network ports to view data, but they can also take over vulnerable printers and transmit their own data through these machines.

Lastly, hackers can exploit vulnerable printers to bypass your cybersecurity system. Once they find a way in through your printers, crooks can then launch broader cyberattacks from within your network, which can be difficult to contain.

What can you do to protect your business printers?

Business printers should not be disregarded when planning a cybersecurity strategy. Keep your print devices secure by following these best practices:

  1. Monitor your network surreptitiously and always promptly install printer software updates and patches. Printer manufacturers often release software support or updates, so always be on the lookout for those.
  2. Change the default password and administrator login credentials of printers with web management capabilities.
  3. Allow only company-owned devices to connect to your printers.
  4. Always connect to your printers using secure connections. Conversely, avoid accessing your printers through a public internet connection.
  5. Restrict printer access by using a firewall.
  6. If your wireless printer has a feature that requires users to enter a PIN before they can print documents, enable it to prevent unauthorized access.
  7. If you don’t use your printer for fax and email, isolate your printer from your main company network and disable out-of-network printing.
  8. If you handle classified data, do not connect your printer to any network. Instead, connect it directly to your computer using data cables or print from a thumb drive.
  9. Secure your printouts by enabling manual feed. This setting requires a user to manually input paper (or any material to be printed on), reducing the risks of the printed document getting stolen or being left in the printing area.

Another way to secure your printers is by partnering with an IT company that can take care of your printer-related worries. From thwarting attacks to reducing management costs to keeping your printer at optimal functionality, our experts can help.

Are you interested in learning more about cybersecurity? Call us today and discover how our wide array of tech services can safeguard your business.

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How to know if your VoIP system is in danger

Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) systems are known for enabling mobile workforces, reducing costs, and offering advanced call features. However, what many people may not know is that VoIP systems are not immune to hackers and cyberattacks. Here are the signs that might indicate that your VoIP system is being hacked.

1. Irregularities in your call history

If you notice multiple calls being made or coming from unfamiliar locations or numbers, it’s usually an indication that your VoIP system may be under attack. Ask for a detailed copy of your call logs from your service provider so you can identify calling patterns that will allow you to pinpoint any irregularities.

2. Redirection to malicious sites

Being redirected to other — often potentially malicious — sites while browsing the internet is a telltale sign that your VoIP system is being hacked. Hackers may also install browser extensions and toolbars without your knowledge. To keep your VoIP system safe, run regular anti-malware scans and always log out of your VoIP account when you’re done using it.

3. Webcams and microphones starting on their own

Webcams and microphones make VoIP phones better than traditional landlines, but cybercriminals can use these features to infiltrate your network. Hackers can use your VoIP’s webcams and microphones to spy on your business, record conversations, and collect private information. If you notice your VoIP phone’s webcam and microphone behaving strangely, report it immediately to an IT specialist or your managed IT services provider (MSP) to see if your VoIP system is being breached by a cybercriminal.

4. Fake antivirus messages pop-ups

When you or your employees see pop-up messages that say your system is infected and needs to be scanned while your VoIP system is on, do not click on those messages. They may be a sign that a hacker has already infiltrated your system. It’s best to have your system administrator or MSP shut down the network so they can identify the source of the pop-ups and scan your system for any malware.

5. Sudden increase in VoIP bills

One benefit of having a VoIP system is a lower monthly bill compared to a landline service. So if you see a sudden spike in your monthly bill, it’s probably a sign that your VoIP system has been hacked. When cybercriminals infiltrate your VoIP network, they can make unauthorized calls to premium numbers without your knowledge.

Safeguarding your VoIP network from cybercriminals requires best-in-class security solutions and security awareness training. For more ways on how you can protect your VoIP system, contact us today.

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Surf securely with a VPN

There was a time when installing an antivirus program was enough to secure your data, but that’s no longer the case today. Whether you want to keep your online activities hidden from third parties or prevent your data from being intercepted by hackers, you need to invest in a virtual private network (VPN).

What is a VPN?

A VPN creates a secure tunnel between your device and the websites you visit, protecting you from hackers looking to intercept your data. All data transmitted and received through this secure connection is encrypted, preventing any third party from monitoring your online activities.

VPNs can also disguise your location. Once you’ve established a connection to a VPN server, your computer acts as if it’s using the same local connection as the VPN. As far as websites are concerned, you are browsing from the server’s geographical area and not your actual location.

Why should you have a VPN?

VPNs augment your cybersecurity and help protect your privacy. For instance, it’s generally considered bad practice to connect to public Wi-Fi networks, like those in cafes, libraries, and airports. This is because all data transmitted through these networks are unencrypted and, thus, are susceptible to exposure and theft. If you must use public Wi-Fi, make sure to activate your VPN. The VPN encrypts your data and keeps your connection secure as you surf the internet.

VPNs’ ability to mask your location also makes them ideal for accessing geo-restricted websites and content. If you’re traveling abroad and you find that critical documents or US websites are geo-blocked in your current location, just connect to a VPN server in the United States to regain access.

How do you choose a VPN?

Given the increasing demand for greater online privacy, VPNs are surging in popularity. When selecting which VPN to purchase, take the following into account:

Cost

There are free VPNs out there, but they likely keep logs of your internet activity or are filled with disruptive ads. That’s why it’s best to invest in paid VPNs like NordVPN and ExpressVPN. These paid options come with robust features, such as a large list of available servers, and configurations that bolster your data’s security.

Location

Where your VPN’s servers are located matters for several reasons. For one, the farther away the server you’re connected to is, the greater the likelihood that you’ll suffer latency issues. For a smooth surfing experience, it’s best to connect to the closest available server. Additionally, if you want to avoid geo-restrictions, you’d want to connect to servers in the same location as the content you’re looking to access. This means if you want to access research published in the United Kingdom, make sure your VPN has servers located in that country.

Capacity

Inquire with the provider or read their terms of service to determine how much data you’re allowed to use. If your tasks require a lot of online resources, then you should choose a VPN with a high data allocation. Also, find out how many of the VPN servers are online; a greater number of online servers means the VPN is capable of supporting resource-intensive tasks

Device compatibility

Choose a VPN that can be used across multiple devices. If you use your laptop, tablet, or smartphone to do your tasks, then you should invest in a VPN that’s compatible with all of these.

IP leak

Some VPN tunnels are not as secure as others. In some cases, the VPN could leak your IP address, enabling third parties to track your data and activities. Before buying a VPN, sign up for a free trial of the service if available. Activate the VPN and visit IP Leak. If the website says your IP address is being leaked, choose a different VPN.

If you need help in selecting the right VPN for your business, consult with our security experts today. We also offer comprehensive cybersecurity services so no hacker or third party can get their hands on your data.

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PHI best practices that all business leaders should know

Protected health information (PHI) is a common target of cybercriminals, as the personal, medical, and financial information that comprise it can be abused for financial gain. This is why businesses that handle PHI should take every step possible to ensure that their clients’ data is always protected.

Provide your staff with regular training

A comprehensive data security training program is necessary to combat ever-evolving threats to the healthcare industry. Training should be done regularly and must cover all the different areas of data security, including the various data breach methods employed by hackers. For instance, your employees should be educated on how to spot phishing attacks, which are the number one cause of data breaches, according to the 2021 Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report.

Understanding how phishing works will help your employees recognize and avoid falling victim to such scams. It’s also important to keep updating your staff with developments in the world of cyberthreats, so that they can stay a step ahead of attackers.

Enforce strict access policies

Place access restrictions on your files and documents to keep unauthorized users from getting their hands on PHI. This entails granting employees access to only the PHI they need to perform their tasks. For instance, accountants should not have access to data about patients’ health conditions. Similarly, physicians shouldn’t be able to see patients’ billing information.

Healthcare executives must also hold employees accountable for accessing PHI for no valid reason. Together with regular cybersecurity training, this will minimize the risk of data breaches resulting from insider threats.

Employ full-disk encryption

Full-disk encryption is an inexpensive and quick method to secure private information saved in computers and portable devices. It renders data indecipherable to users who don’t possess the matching decryption key. This means that even if an employee’s laptop or smartphone is lost or stolen, the thief won’t be able to access any encrypted PHI stored in it.

Build a resilient infrastructure

Malware is a blanket term for viruses, Trojans, and other harmful programs that cybercriminals use to damage systems and gain access to sensitive data. To ensure the security of PHI, your healthcare organization must build an IT infrastructure that is protected against malware of all kinds.

This involves setting up safeguards to keep malware and other threats at bay, such as advanced firewalls, intrusion prevention systems, and email filtering software. You should also consider network segregation and segmentation to block hackers’ attempts to penetrate your networks and steal PHI.

If malware does manage to infiltrate your network, stop it from spreading by deploying next-gen anti-malware software that can detect and quarantine any signs of a breach. If such systems fail, you’d also need a data backup and recovery plan so you can continue caring for your patients even during a major incident.

Implement physical security measures

Many healthcare organizations still rely on paper-based PHI and store these in file cabinets. Secure these valuable assets by installing physical security controls, such as surveillance cameras and card entry systems, in the areas of your facility where records are stored. You should also implement strict record log-out procedures, which will help ensure that only authorized personnel can access records that contain sensitive data and that these are returned promptly.

To learn more about how you can secure PHI and other digital assets, drop us a line today. Our team of professionals can provide you with the knowledge and assistance you need.

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What is proactive cybersecurity, and how do you implement it?

To keep cyberthreats at bay, you need proactive cybersecurity solutions in your arsenal. They identify and contain threats before they wreak havoc on your systems and cause significant productivity and financial losses. Here’s all you need to know about proactive cybersecurity and how to implement it.

What is proactive cybersecurity?

Traditional cybersecurity is reactive — your IT team or managed IT services provider (MSP) will be alerted of a cyberattack after it has happened, leaving them to alleviate the impacts. In contrast, proactive cybersecurity is preventative — it takes into account all potential threats and seeks to identify vulnerabilities so that they can be addressed before they lead to larger, downtime-causing issues.

Many organizations have adopted proactive cybersecurity measures along with reactive ones and are now reaping the benefits, including the ability to stay one step ahead of cyberthreats and improved data compliance.

How to implement proactive cybersecurity

In adopting a proactive approach to cybersecurity in your organization, you must follow these steps:

  1. Understand the threats you’re facing
    Before you can work toward preventing cyberattacks, you must know exactly what you’re up against. Seek the help of your in-house IT staff or MSP in identifying the types of attacks that are most common in your industry.
  2. Reevaluate what it is you’re protecting
    Once you have a list of the biggest threats to your organization, you need to take stock of how each can damage the various components of your network. Map out every company device that connects to the internet, what type of data they have access to (regulated, mission-critical, low-importance, etc.), and what services are currently protecting those devices.
  3. Choose proactive cybersecurity measures to put in place
    Depending on the risks and assets uncovered in steps 1 and 2, your IT team or MSP may recommend any of the following measures:
Proactive measure What it entails
Security awareness seminars for all internal stakeholders Train everyone from the receptionist to the CEO about effective security practices such as password management, proper mobile device usage, and spam awareness.
Updated anti-malware software or cloud-based service Protect your data and systems against the latest and most menacing malware.
Routine software patches and upgrades Minimize the chances of leaving a backdoor to your network open.
Web filtering services Blacklist dangerous and inappropriate sites for anyone on your network.
Perimeter defenses (e.g., intrusion prevention systems and hardware firewalls) Scrutinize everything trying to sneak its way in through the borders of your network.
Policy of least privilege Limit users’ access only to the data they need to fulfill their tasks.
Data segmentation Rank data according to sensitivity and build micro-perimeters around high-value datasets.
Full-disk encryption Make data stored in computers and portable devices unreadable so that if these machines are stolen, the files they have inside remain secure.
Virtual private networks Make data transmitted across unsecured connections unreadable so that intercepting it would become futile.
Strict access controls Prevent unauthorized access to accounts by using strong passwords, multifactor authentication, and auto screen locks and logouts for idle users. 
AI-powered network monitoring Identify suspicious user and software behaviors such as employees accessing files outside their departments.

If you’re looking to implement a proactive cybersecurity strategy to protect your business’s critical systems, give our professionals a call today. We’ll assess your needs and recommend the best, most effective solutions to address them.

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