Easy steps to reduce data usage on your Android device

If you don’t have an unlimited data plan for your Android device, uncontrolled downloading can result in slower connections, poor battery life, and high overage charges. But do you know that you can reduce your data consumption without affecting your mobile experience? Follow these handy tips.

Delete data-draining apps

Apps that constantly consume your mobile data, such as Facebook, Google Maps, and YouTube, can accelerate hardware and battery life deterioration as well as lower the device’s efficiency. If you have data-draining apps, consider removing them from your device to lower your monthly data usage.

To identify such apps, go to Settings > Network & internet > Internet > App data usage. From there, you can see which apps are consuming the most data, and you can delete the worst offenders.

Restrict background data

Background data is a feature that allows apps to provide real-time updates by using data connection even when the app isn’t actively in use or the phone is locked. It is also one surefire way to burn through a significant chunk of your monthly data plan.

To prevent background data from constantly updating, go to Settings > Network & internet > Internet. Then, select App data usage to see your top data-draining apps. Tap on an app to show its settings, and toggle the button under “Background data” to Off.

Use data saver mode

To ensure that you’re not using too much data on your data plan, check and change your data usage setting. All you have to do is go to Settings > Network & internet > Internet > Data Saver.

When you turn Data Saver on, some apps are prevented from sending or receiving data in the background. While any app you currently use can still download data, it will do so less frequently. For instance, images on a web page won’t display until you tap them.

Beware of auto-updates

Software updates can require hundreds of megabytes of data, so it’s better to update your apps over Wi-Fi than through your data connection. You may not even realize updates are happening if you have the auto-update setting enabled. Turn it off by opening the Google Play Store and tapping the three horizontal lines in the upper-left corner. Go to Settings > Auto-update apps > Over Wi-Fi only.

Take your apps offline

Some apps include an offline access option. For example, Google Docs lets you choose the documents you’d like to access while disconnected from the internet. This allows you to save your work offline and only update its online version once you are connected to the internet. Check regularly for offline access options and enable them whenever possible.

These are some quick and easy tips for IT novices, but if you’re on the hunt for expert solutions and support for Android devices, get in touch with our team today.

This post was originally published on this site

4 Data backup solutions for your business

Modern businesses use data in almost every aspect of their operations. Without immediate and constant access to it, organizations will come to a grinding halt. That’s why it’s critical to have data backups — in the event of a disaster, companies risk losing valuable data if they don’t have backup strategies in place. Here are four data backup solutions you can implement to prevent such a scenario.

USB flash drives

USB flash drives are data storage devices that include flash memory with an integrated USB interface. They are not just inexpensive and portable, but they can also be used to back up data from several computers.

However, USB flash drives are easy to misplace, which is why they’re not suitable for long-term data storage. They are better used as intermediate backups.

External hard drives

External hard drives are portable hard drives that can be connected to a computer through a USB port. These devices have the lowest cost per gigabyte compared to other backup devices and boast quick transfer rates, allowing users to back up a large amount of data within seconds.

One of the drawbacks of using external hard drives is that you’ll need to update your backups regularly to include new files. There’s also the risk of the device being misused or stolen. For example, an employee might use the drive for storing personal files or take it with them when they quit.

Network-attached storage (NAS)

NAS is a dedicated server for storing data, and it can also be used as an email server. It has its own IP address and can operate either wired or wirelessly. NAS also offers data redundancyㅡ it generates a backup of your backups, ensuring that your files are fully protected.

On the downside, NAS can’t be scaled beyond system limits. This means that you have to purchase additional hard drive bays if you need more capacity. NAS is also vulnerable to malware, and you have to configure it a certain way to keep it protected.

Cloud storage

Cloud storage is becoming increasingly popular among businesses because of its many benefits. For one, it allows users to access their data from anywhere using any internet-connected device. It also enables businesses to pay for only the resources they use. Lastly, cloud service providers (CSPs) handle the installation, management, and maintenance processes themselves, allowing you to focus on more important business matters.

However, some CSPs don’t implement sufficient security measures on their systems, potentially exposing data to cyberthreats. This makes cloud storage an unsuitable solution for medical practices, law firms, and other organizations that handle sensitive data. To use the cloud, businesses in these sectors must find a service provider that implements top-of-the-line cybersecurity protocols and specializes in data regulations compliance.

Choosing the best backup solution has far-reaching impacts on your business. Each method or device has trade-offs, which is why you need to select the one best suited to your business’s needs. Enlist the help of our experts to ensure you make the right choice.

This post was originally published on this site

4 Data backup solutions for your business

Modern businesses use data in almost every aspect of their operations. Without immediate and constant access to it, organizations will come to a grinding halt. That’s why it’s critical to have data backups — in the event of a disaster, companies risk losing valuable data if they don’t have backup strategies in place. Here are four data backup solutions you can implement to prevent such a scenario.

USB flash drives

USB flash drives are data storage devices that include flash memory with an integrated USB interface. They are not just inexpensive and portable, but they can also be used to back up data from several computers.

However, USB flash drives are easy to misplace, which is why they’re not suitable for long-term data storage. They are better used as intermediate backups.

External hard drives

External hard drives are portable hard drives that can be connected to a computer through a USB port. These devices have the lowest cost per gigabyte compared to other backup devices and boast quick transfer rates, allowing users to back up a large amount of data within seconds.

One of the drawbacks of using external hard drives is that you’ll need to update your backups regularly to include new files. There’s also the risk of the device being misused or stolen. For example, an employee might use the drive for storing personal files or take it with them when they quit.

Network-attached storage (NAS)

NAS is a dedicated server for storing data, and it can also be used as an email server. It has its own IP address and can operate either wired or wirelessly. NAS also offers data redundancyㅡ it generates a backup of your backups, ensuring that your files are fully protected.

On the downside, NAS can’t be scaled beyond system limits. This means that you have to purchase additional hard drive bays if you need more capacity. NAS is also vulnerable to malware, and you have to configure it a certain way to keep it protected.

Cloud storage

Cloud storage is becoming increasingly popular among businesses because of its many benefits. For one, it allows users to access their data from anywhere using any internet-connected device. It also enables businesses to pay for only the resources they use. Lastly, cloud service providers (CSPs) handle the installation, management, and maintenance processes themselves, allowing you to focus on more important business matters.

However, some CSPs don’t implement sufficient security measures on their systems, potentially exposing data to cyberthreats. This makes cloud storage an unsuitable solution for medical practices, law firms, and other organizations that handle sensitive data. To use the cloud, businesses in these sectors must find a service provider that implements top-of-the-line cybersecurity protocols and specializes in data regulations compliance.

Choosing the best backup solution has far-reaching impacts on your business. Each method or device has trade-offs, which is why you need to select the one best suited to your business’s needs. Enlist the help of our experts to ensure you make the right choice.

This post was originally published on this site