Boost Mac performance with an SSD upgrade

The latest Mac models are now built with solid state drives (SSDs), whereas older models have hard disk drives (HDDs), which are slower. Macs with SSDs are much faster than those with HDDs, but speed is not the only benefit of using SSDs for storage.

They’re more reliable

Most consumer SSDs use NAND flash memory, a type of nonvolatile storage technology that doesn’t require power to retain data. This technology eliminates the risk of losing or corrupting data in case the SSD is left unplugged. And if SSDs fail, your computer would still be able to read data, unless the actual memory chips are damaged.

Moreover, HDDs rely on magnetism to write data, so exposing your computer to a strong magnet could erase all information on your drive. This is an unlikely problem with SSDs, which do not contain parts with magnetic coatings that can be easily damaged when exposed to a magnetic field.

They’re faster

SSDs have the clear advantage over HDDs in terms of data access speed. To access data, a typical SSD takes about 35 to 100 microseconds, which is about 100 times faster than an HDD. This means your Mac boots up in less than a minute, programs launch and run more quickly, and files are transferred faster, letting you do data-intensive work without worrying that your computer will stall or freeze.

They’re quieter

In fact, SSDs don’t make any noise at all. Again, this has something to do with their non-mechanical nature. SSDs don’t have any of the moving parts that make mechanical HDDs, especially the faster ones, noisy. A Mac with an SSD is generally quieter, even when it’s performing intensive tasks.

They’re more durable and longer-lasting

Unlike HDDs, SSDs are less prone to damage due to shock and vibration. This is because SSDs do not have any of the moving parts like drive platters and read arms that HDDs do, so they won’t break if you drop, bump, or jostle your Mac.

They will fail over time, however, but it’s likely that your SSD will outlast your computer for many years. While consumer SSDs do have a limited number of reads and writes, under normal use, they can make it to at least 700 TB of writes before failing. To put this in perspective, you would have to write 40 GB of data every day for 50 years to get to 700 TB, which means you don’t have to worry that you’ll wear out your SSD from overuse anytime soon.

They’re more energy-efficient

Compared to HDDs, SSDs don’t need as much power to run. Even at full sprint, they use up at least 50% less power than HDDs. This also has to do with SSDs’ lack of moving parts that consume electricity to read, write, and access information. And because SSDs don’t have these parts, they produce less heat, which also contributes to a reduction in power consumption. Less power consumed also helps improve your Mac’s performance and extend its service life.

An SSD will definitely improve your Mac’s overall performance, which translates to a boost in your productivity and efficiency. If you’re ready to upgrade your Mac with an SSD or have any questions about storage drives, call us today.

This post was originally published on this site

Boost Mac performance with an SSD upgrade

The latest Mac models are now built with solid state drives (SSDs), whereas older models have hard disk drives (HDDs), which are slower. Macs with SSDs are much faster than those with HDDs, but speed is not the only benefit of using SSDs for storage.

They’re more reliable

Most consumer SSDs use NAND flash memory, a type of nonvolatile storage technology that doesn’t require power to retain data. This technology eliminates the risk of losing or corrupting data in case the SSD is left unplugged. And if SSDs fail, your computer would still be able to read data, unless the actual memory chips are damaged.

Moreover, HDDs rely on magnetism to write data, so exposing your computer to a strong magnet could erase all information on your drive. This is an unlikely problem with SSDs, which do not contain parts with magnetic coatings that can be easily damaged when exposed to a magnetic field.

They’re faster

SSDs have the clear advantage over HDDs in terms of data access speed. To access data, a typical SSD takes about 35 to 100 microseconds, which is about 100 times faster than an HDD. This means your Mac boots up in less than a minute, programs launch and run more quickly, and files are transferred faster, letting you do data-intensive work without worrying that your computer will stall or freeze.

They’re quieter

In fact, SSDs don’t make any noise at all. Again, this has something to do with their non-mechanical nature. SSDs don’t have any of the moving parts that make mechanical HDDs, especially the faster ones, noisy. A Mac with an SSD is generally quieter, even when it’s performing intensive tasks.

They’re more durable and longer-lasting

Unlike HDDs, SSDs are less prone to damage due to shock and vibration. This is because SSDs do not have any of the moving parts like drive platters and read arms that HDDs do, so they won’t break if you drop, bump, or jostle your Mac.

They will fail over time, however, but it’s likely that your SSD will outlast your computer for many years. While consumer SSDs do have a limited number of reads and writes, under normal use, they can make it to at least 700 TB of writes before failing. To put this in perspective, you would have to write 40 GB of data every day for 50 years to get to 700 TB, which means you don’t have to worry that you’ll wear out your SSD from overuse anytime soon.

They’re more energy-efficient

Compared to HDDs, SSDs don’t need as much power to run. Even at full sprint, they use up at least 50% less power than HDDs. This also has to do with SSDs’ lack of moving parts that consume electricity to read, write, and access information. And because SSDs don’t have these parts, they produce less heat, which also contributes to a reduction in power consumption. Less power consumed also helps improve your Mac’s performance and extend its service life.

An SSD will definitely improve your Mac’s overall performance, which translates to a boost in your productivity and efficiency. If you’re ready to upgrade your Mac with an SSD or have any questions about storage drives, call us today.

This post was originally published on this site

Why you should consider SSD over HDD

Computer and laptop buyers today need to make a decision between getting either a solid state drive (SSD) or a hard disk drive (HDD) as a primary storage component for their device. But which one is the better choice? In this article we outline the distinct features of SSD and HDD so you can make the right decision for your next purchase.

What is an HDD?

An HDD is basically a storage device in a computer. It consists of metal platters with magnetic coating, a spindle, and various moving parts to process and store data. The common size for laptop hard drives is the 2.5” model, while a larger 3.5” model is usually found in desktop computers.

What is an SSD?

An SSD is another type of data storage that performs the same job as an HDD. But instead of storing data in a magnetic coating on top of platters, an SSD uses flash memory chips and an embedded processor to store, retrieve, and cache data. It is roughly about the same size as a typical HDD, and resembles smartphone batteries.

HDD and SSD comparison

The differences in capabilities between the two storage devices can be grouped into six categories:

1. Speed

This is where SSDs truly prevail. While HDDs need a long time to access data and files because the disk must spin to find it, SSDs can complete this task 200% faster since data is instantly accessed through flash memory chips. This is why an SSD-equipped PC will boot operating systems within seconds and deliver blazing-fast speed for launching programs and applications, whereas a computer that uses an HDD will take a much longer time to boot the operating system, and will continue to perform slower than an SSD during normal use.

2. Capacity

The largest SSD units have a maximum 100 TB storage capacity. Although there are large SSDs, anything that’s over 1 TB will cost businesses a lot of money. HDDs, on the other hand, have much larger capacities available for much more affordable prices.

3. Durability

HDDs consist of various moving parts and components, making them susceptible to shock and damage. The longer you use your HDD, the more it wears down and most eventually end up failing. Meanwhile, an SSD uses a nonmechanical design of flash storage mounted on a circuit board, providing better performance and reliability, and making it more likely to keep your files and data safe.

4. Noise

An HDD can sometimes be the loudest part of your computer. Even the highest-performing HDDs will emit some noise when the drive is spinning back and forth to process data. SSDs have no moving parts, meaning it makes no noise at all.

5. Heat

More moving parts means more heat, and HDD users will have to live with the fact that their device will degenerate over time. SSD uses flash memory, generating less heat, helping to increase its lifespan.

6. Cost

SSDs are generally much more expensive than HDDs for the same capacity. This is why many budget laptops may only have up to 512 GB of SSD storage.

Despite the high costs and low capacity, however, SSDs are the clear winner over HDDs in terms of performance. While you’re paying more for less memory with an SSD, you’re investing in a faster and far more durable data storage option in the long run.

We recommend using an SSD as the primary storage for your operating system, applications, and most-used programs. Many laptops and computers also allow you to install additional SSDs, so you can upgrade as required if your storage needs grow. Implementing HDD as a secondary storage unit is another great idea, especially if you need a place to store documents and pictures because they don’t need to leverage the incredible access times and speeds of an SSD.

Looking to invest in some new hardware for your business? Talk with our experts before you make a decision. We can provide sound advice and help guide you in the right direction.

This post was originally published on this site

Why you should consider SSD over HDD

Computer and laptop buyers today need to make a decision between getting either a solid state drive (SSD) or a hard disk drive (HDD) as a primary storage component for their device. But which one is the better choice? In this article we outline the distinct features of SSD and HDD so you can make the right decision for your next purchase.

What is an HDD?

An HDD is basically a storage device in a computer. It consists of metal platters with magnetic coating, a spindle, and various moving parts to process and store data. The common size for laptop hard drives is the 2.5” model, while a larger 3.5” model is usually found in desktop computers.

What is an SSD?

An SSD is another type of data storage that performs the same job as an HDD. But instead of storing data in a magnetic coating on top of platters, an SSD uses flash memory chips and an embedded processor to store, retrieve, and cache data. It is roughly about the same size as a typical HDD, and resembles smartphone batteries.

HDD and SSD comparison

The differences in capabilities between the two storage devices can be grouped into six categories:

1. Speed

This is where SSDs truly prevail. While HDDs need a long time to access data and files because the disk must spin to find it, SSDs can complete this task 200% faster since data is instantly accessed through flash memory chips. This is why an SSD-equipped PC will boot operating systems within seconds and deliver blazing-fast speed for launching programs and applications, whereas a computer that uses an HDD will take a much longer time to boot the operating system, and will continue to perform slower than an SSD during normal use.

2. Capacity

The largest SSD units have a maximum 100 TB storage capacity. Although there are large SSDs, anything that’s over 1 TB will cost businesses a lot of money. HDDs, on the other hand, have much larger capacities available for much more affordable prices.

3. Durability

HDDs consist of various moving parts and components, making them susceptible to shock and damage. The longer you use your HDD, the more it wears down and most eventually end up failing. Meanwhile, an SSD uses a nonmechanical design of flash storage mounted on a circuit board, providing better performance and reliability, and making it more likely to keep your files and data safe.

4. Noise

An HDD can sometimes be the loudest part of your computer. Even the highest-performing HDDs will emit some noise when the drive is spinning back and forth to process data. SSDs have no moving parts, meaning it makes no noise at all.

5. Heat

More moving parts means more heat, and HDD users will have to live with the fact that their device will degenerate over time. SSD uses flash memory, generating less heat, helping to increase its lifespan.

6. Cost

SSDs are generally much more expensive than HDDs for the same capacity. This is why many budget laptops may only have up to 512 GB of SSD storage.

Despite the high costs and low capacity, however, SSDs are the clear winner over HDDs in terms of performance. While you’re paying more for less memory with an SSD, you’re investing in a faster and far more durable data storage option in the long run.

We recommend using an SSD as the primary storage for your operating system, applications, and most-used programs. Many laptops and computers also allow you to install additional SSDs, so you can upgrade as required if your storage needs grow. Implementing HDD as a secondary storage unit is another great idea, especially if you need a place to store documents and pictures because they don’t need to leverage the incredible access times and speeds of an SSD.

Looking to invest in some new hardware for your business? Talk with our experts before you make a decision. We can provide sound advice and help guide you in the right direction.

This post was originally published on this site

5 Tips to speed up your Mac

So you’re trying to finish an urgent task, but your Mac isn’t performing as fast as you need it to. What can you do? Knowing why your machine is slowing down is key to returning it to its former speed. We have prepared five common reasons Macs become sluggish and what you can do to resolve the problem.

Clean up your Login Items

The Login Items list (also known as the Startup List) contains all the apps and programs that automatically start when you log in. Having too many Login Items forces your computer to work harder at startup, slowing it down.

You can remedy this by going to System Preferences and selecting Users & Groups. Click on Login Items to see the list of the apps that open on startup. Highlight the apps you want to prevent from launching automatically and click the minus button underneath the list.

Start up in Safe Mode

Your Mac’s Safe Mode can be used to troubleshoot system-wide issues, including problems with particular apps. Booting up in Safe Mode also deletes system caches.

Cache files are temporary data stored on a hard drive to speed up various processes, such as loading websites or certain apps. Unfortunately, some of these files can become corrupted, which results in your computer slowing down. To bring back your Mac’s speed, you will need to clear the cache and delete temporary files.

Starting up in Safe Mode is easy. Just press the Power button and immediately after the computer starts, press and hold the Shift key on your keyboard. Release the key once you see the gray Apple logo and the progress indicator.

If you want to leave Safe Mode, just restart your computer. Make sure not to press any key once the machine starts up.

Upgrade to solid state drive (SSD) storage

An SSD is a disk storage system that uses interconnected flash-memory chips to store your data. It’s faster and more reliable than a hard disk drive (HDD), which stores data in a spinning magnetic disk. HDD has been around for years, but many new computers continue to use it. If your Mac uses HDD storage, upgrading to SSD will amplify its processing speed.

But before you proceed, know that SSD storage costs more than HDD. If you want the same storage capacity offered by your machine’s HDD on your SSD, be prepared to shell out some extra money. Alternatively, you can settle for a much smaller memory capacity and just upgrade to a bigger one once your budget allows it.

Free up storage space

Having too many files can reduce your Mac’s speed. To free up space, just click on the Apple logo located on the top left corner of the screen. Select About This Mac and go to the <Storage tab. Here, you will see how much free space your computer has.

If your Mac’s storage is nearing full capacity, clicking the Manage button will give you four options:

  • Store in iCloud – This offloads various content, including your files and text messages, to the cloud.
  • Optimize Storage – This optimizes the TV app storage by deleting videos you’ve already watched.
  • Empty Trash Automatically – With this option, all items that have been in Trash for 30 days will be automatically removed.
  • Reduce Clutter – This lets you see the large files stored in your computer, and allows you to delete them manually to save space.

Update to the latest macOS version

macOS updates benefit your computer’s speed in several ways. First, they contain performance enhancements that help your computer run as smoothly as possible. Second, they augment your Mac’s protection against cyberthreats, which can slow down your machine. Updates are free, so you should install them once they become available.

You can also configure your computer to install updates automatically. In System Preferences, select Software Update. Go to Automatically keep my Mac up to date and check the box.

If you’ve tried one or several of these tips and are still experiencing sluggishness, it may be time to consider other options, such as trading in your old Mac for a new one. But before you do that, let us help you explore other ways to improve the performance of your trusty machine. Get in touch with us today.

This post was originally published on this site