HIPAA calls for careful social media behavior

Healthcare providers that use social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter can interact with their patients, advertise new services, and communicate urgent announcements. Even though there’s immense potential for social media to improve healthcare, it can also expose patient-specific information when used irresponsibly.

What social media actions violate HIPAA rules?

Posting patients’ protected health information on social media, even if it’s accidentally, without the patients’ permission or authority is a violation of HIPAA regulations. This includes actions like:

  • Sharing pictures (like a team lunch in the workplace) with patient information visible in the background
  • Sharing any form of PHI (such as images or videos)
  • Posting any information that could identify an individual
  • Sharing gossip about a patient, even if the patient’s name is not mentioned

What are the consequences of violating HIPAA?

People in the healthcare industry should not treat HIPAA violations lightly. If an employee is found guilty of breaking a HIPAA rule, they could face fines between $100 and $1,500,000 depending on the severity of the violation. They could also face a 10-year jail sentence, lawsuits, job termination, and revocation of their medical license.

How can healthcare organizations prevent violations?

There are simple ways to avoid HIPAA violations while using social media:

  • Don’t post stories about patients on social media. Even if the patient’s name is omitted, the patient could still be identified by their diagnosis or treatment.
  • Check the background of photos before posting. Make sure there are policies that prohibit employees from posting photos of a patient or their information.
  • Prohibit employees from offering medical advice on social media. It’s best practice to refrain from posting diagnosis or treatment plans on social media, even if a patient asks for medical advice.
  • Always get written permission. Sometimes, a patient’s story is too great not to share. Maybe they made an astonishing recovery or exhibited great strength in the face of adversity and you want to share their accomplishment. In cases like these, ask for written permission from the patient before posting anything on social media.
  • Undergo training on HIPAA security and HIPAA privacy procedures and policies. Make sure to discuss topics such as workstation use, workstation security, and using personal devices for work. These procedures ensure that employees comply with HIPAA rules and are protecting patient information, whether it be electronic, written, or oral.

Do you work in the healthcare industry and need help managing IT and privacy issues? Feel free to call us today!

This post was originally published on this site

HIPAA calls for careful social media behavior

Healthcare providers that use social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter can interact with their patients, advertise new services, and communicate urgent announcements. Even though there’s immense potential for social media to improve healthcare, it can also expose patient-specific information when used irresponsibly.

What social media actions violate HIPAA rules?

Posting patients’ protected health information on social media, even if it’s accidentally, without the patients’ permission or authority is a violation of HIPAA regulations. This includes actions like:

  • Sharing pictures (like a team lunch in the workplace) with patient information visible in the background
  • Sharing any form of PHI (such as images or videos)
  • Posting any information that could identify an individual
  • Sharing gossip about a patient, even if the patient’s name is not mentioned

What are the consequences of violating HIPAA?

People in the healthcare industry should not treat HIPAA violations lightly. If an employee is found guilty of breaking a HIPAA rule, they could face fines between $100 and $1,500,000 depending on the severity of the violation. They could also face a 10-year jail sentence, lawsuits, job termination, and revocation of their medical license.

How can healthcare organizations prevent violations?

There are simple ways to avoid HIPAA violations while using social media:

  • Don’t post stories about patients on social media. Even if the patient’s name is omitted, the patient could still be identified by their diagnosis or treatment.
  • Check the background of photos before posting. Make sure there are policies that prohibit employees from posting photos of a patient or their information.
  • Prohibit employees from offering medical advice on social media. It’s best practice to refrain from posting diagnosis or treatment plans on social media, even if a patient asks for medical advice.
  • Always get written permission. Sometimes, a patient’s story is too great not to share. Maybe they made an astonishing recovery or exhibited great strength in the face of adversity and you want to share their accomplishment. In cases like these, ask for written permission from the patient before posting anything on social media.
  • Undergo training on HIPAA security and HIPAA privacy procedures and policies. Make sure to discuss topics such as workstation use, workstation security, and using personal devices for work. These procedures ensure that employees comply with HIPAA rules and are protecting patient information, whether it be electronic, written, or oral.

Do you work in the healthcare industry and need help managing IT and privacy issues? Feel free to call us today!

This post was originally published on this site

EHRs: Are they worth it?

Digitization is significantly changing the way healthcare organizations deliver care and services to patients. In particular, the use of electronic health records (EHRs) is improving the accuracy and accessibility of patient information. Despite this, the adoption rate of EHRs is still low and meets resistance from many healthcare providers. Here’s what your practice should consider to determine whether or not transitioning from filing cabinets to cloud storage is worth it.

What is an electronic health record?

An electronic health record (EHR) is an individual’s official health document that’s accessible via mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets, and shareable between multiple facilities and agencies.

Typically, an EHR includes contact information, allergies, family history, list of medications, information regarding previous surgeries and procedures, and other relevant patient information.

How EHRs improve patient care

The use of EHRs improves patient care in significant ways. For one, EHRs can aid in diagnosing illnesses based on patients’ history and complete health information. EHRs can also help reduce medical errors and false positives. Records can also be updated to provide last known information to the provider at the point of care.

Lastly, EHRs can also improve overall public health by providing a bird’s-eye view of the overall health of an entire patient population. This lets providers identify risk factors that most impact the patients and proactively prepare for potential outbreaks or illnesses.

The big debate: EHRs vs. paper records

The long-standing debate of digital versus traditional data storage has expanded to every industry, and healthcare isn’t spared from it either. While most agree that EHRs offer more benefits in comparison with paper records, EHRs themselves are not without drawbacks. Below are some of the major differences between paper and electronic records, which could help you decide whether or not to shift to an EHR system.

  1. Time – EHRs can save emergency care providers time during a patient’s visit. And in case of emergency, these records can provide critical, life-saving information. However, experts in the field find that the learning curve in using EHRs is too steep and reduces healthcare providers into becoming data entry staff. Also, all the typing, clicking, and pointing have caused physicians to become distracted from their patients.
  2. Environment – One of the most obvious benefits of going digital is the reduction of adverse environmental impacts. A typical paper-based medical record usually encompasses close to hundreds of pages and might even run into the thousands in the most extreme cases. Conversely, digital solutions save paper, trees, and other resources used to make paper products.
  3. Security – Paper records can be compromised in two ways: by being misplaced or getting stolen. EHRs, on the other hand, are at risk due to the increasing prevalence of cyberattacks. Recent years, in particular, have been rough for the healthcare industry, as evidenced by the occurrence of numerous cybersecurity and data breaches involving thousands of medical records.
  4. Cost – Large healthcare providers often have to pay large sums of money to purchase, install, and gain full access to EHR systems. Maintaining paper records, by contrast, requires only human administrative costs and storage costs.
  5. Access – One of the biggest gripes against paper records is that they are incredibly tedious to access and share. Obtaining a paper record involves first having to find it and then either mailing, faxing, or scanning the copies. Sharing EHRs, on the other hand, is much easier; patients and medical personnel can access information via an app or by sending a photo via a secured network.
  6. Illegibility – A physician’s penmanship is often tough to read and decipher, and very easy to misinterpret. Paper records are also notorious for not providing enough space for a physician to jot everything down legibly. With EHRs, notes can be typewritten without regard for space, reducing concerns regarding illegibility.

EHRs in the future

Experts on the subject seem to believe that EHRs need to evolve a little more before being fully accepted and integrated by all healthcare institutions. Some changes include:

  • Reducing the data entry burden
  • Including remote monitoring
  • Increasing transparency
  • Increasing room for patient engagement

Despite these, we can still expect EHRs in the future to eventually have more in-depth content and provide a more layered representation of a person’s history. Over time, this will lead to more accurate diagnoses and more appropriate treatment plans.

Would you like advice on the best EHR systems in the market or on how to implement these? Look no further and let our experts guide you. Call us today!

This post was originally published on this site

EHRs: Are they worth it?

Digitization is significantly changing the way healthcare organizations deliver care and services to patients. In particular, the use of electronic health records (EHRs) is improving the accuracy and accessibility of patient information. Despite this, the adoption rate of EHRs is still low and meets resistance from many healthcare providers. Here’s what your practice should consider to determine whether or not transitioning from filing cabinets to cloud storage is worth it.

What is an electronic health record?

An electronic health record (EHR) is an individual’s official health document that’s accessible via mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets, and shareable between multiple facilities and agencies.

Typically, an EHR includes contact information, allergies, family history, list of medications, information regarding previous surgeries and procedures, and other relevant patient information.

How EHRs improve patient care

The use of EHRs improves patient care in significant ways. For one, EHRs can aid in diagnosing illnesses based on patients’ history and complete health information. EHRs can also help reduce medical errors and false positives. Records can also be updated to provide last known information to the provider at the point of care.

Lastly, EHRs can also improve overall public health by providing a bird’s-eye view of the overall health of an entire patient population. This lets providers identify risk factors that most impact the patients and proactively prepare for potential outbreaks or illnesses.

The big debate: EHRs vs. paper records

The long-standing debate of digital versus traditional data storage has expanded to every industry, and healthcare isn’t spared from it either. While most agree that EHRs offer more benefits in comparison with paper records, EHRs themselves are not without drawbacks. Below are some of the major differences between paper and electronic records, which could help you decide whether or not to shift to an EHR system.

  1. Time – EHRs can save emergency care providers time during a patient’s visit. And in case of emergency, these records can provide critical, life-saving information. However, experts in the field find that the learning curve in using EHRs is too steep and reduces healthcare providers into becoming data entry staff. Also, all the typing, clicking, and pointing have caused physicians to become distracted from their patients.
  2. Environment – One of the most obvious benefits of going digital is the reduction of adverse environmental impacts. A typical paper-based medical record usually encompasses close to hundreds of pages and might even run into the thousands in the most extreme cases. Conversely, digital solutions save paper, trees, and other resources used to make paper products.
  3. Security – Paper records can be compromised in two ways: by being misplaced or getting stolen. EHRs, on the other hand, are at risk due to the increasing prevalence of cyberattacks. Recent years, in particular, have been rough for the healthcare industry, as evidenced by the occurrence of numerous cybersecurity and data breaches involving thousands of medical records.
  4. Cost – Large healthcare providers often have to pay large sums of money to purchase, install, and gain full access to EHR systems. Maintaining paper records, by contrast, requires only human administrative costs and storage costs.
  5. Access – One of the biggest gripes against paper records is that they are incredibly tedious to access and share. Obtaining a paper record involves first having to find it and then either mailing, faxing, or scanning the copies. Sharing EHRs, on the other hand, is much easier; patients and medical personnel can access information via an app or by sending a photo via a secured network.
  6. Illegibility – A physician’s penmanship is often tough to read and decipher, and very easy to misinterpret. Paper records are also notorious for not providing enough space for a physician to jot everything down legibly. With EHRs, notes can be typewritten without regard for space, reducing concerns regarding illegibility.

EHRs in the future

Experts on the subject seem to believe that EHRs need to evolve a little more before being fully accepted and integrated by all healthcare institutions. Some changes include:

  • Reducing the data entry burden
  • Including remote monitoring
  • Increasing transparency
  • Increasing room for patient engagement

Despite these, we can still expect EHRs in the future to eventually have more in-depth content and provide a more layered representation of a person’s history. Over time, this will lead to more accurate diagnoses and more appropriate treatment plans.

Would you like advice on the best EHR systems in the market or on how to implement these? Look no further and let our experts guide you. Call us today!

This post was originally published on this site

IoT security in healthcare: What you need to know

The Internet of Things (IoT) is revolutionizing the healthcare industry. By remotely capturing medical data, facilitating medication delivery, and improving healthcare accessibility, IoT devices today are changing the practice of medicine and helping save more lives. But as with any new technology, IoT also brings a slew of security risks that healthcare practices need to address.

Computing devices that contain a treasure trove of patient data are attractive targets for cybercriminals. Healthcare apps, for instance, hold plenty of sensitive information, such as Social Security numbers, prescriptions, and medical histories. Should hackers ever get a hold of this information, they could resell it on the dark web or use it to steal their victim’s identity. They could even use this information to gain direct control over other IoT equipment, which would lead to even bigger consequences.

Similarly, hackers could exploit vulnerable medical devices to infiltrate even the most secure networks. They could use compromised IoT devices to sneak ransomware and other types of malware into a network, causing service disruptions and preventing practitioners from providing responsive treatment.

To effectively defend against IoT-related risks in your healthcare practice, consider the following:

Use multifactor authentication (MFA)

MFA requires users to provide more information than just their username and password to prove their identity, such as a password or PIN, an SMS code, or a fingerprint or retina scan. By enabling MFA on your networks and devices, hackers will have a harder time accessing your accounts and sensitive data.

Encrypt your data

Another way to protect your business and your patients from a massive data breach is through encryption. Encrypting electronic health records while they’re being transmitted or kept in storage prevents hackers from intercepting and reading confidential information.

If possible, everything that is transmitted across your network should be encrypted automatically to secure communications between IoT devices.

Install intrusion prevention systems

Since most IoT attacks are delivered via the internet, intrusion prevention systems are crucial to identifying and blocking unauthorized connections to your network. When you install intrusion prevention systems, hackers who try to remotely access or shut down your IoT equipment will be stopped before they damage your systems.

Security updates

Last but not least, IoT manufacturers regularly release security patches for their gadgets. Get in the habit of downloading these updates as soon they’re rolled out, or program your devices to automatically download and update themselves to ensure their safety from the latest threats.

When it comes to security, healthcare institutions have their work cut out for them. But whether you’re dealing with hardware security, data privacy, or regulatory compliance, it’s a good idea to partner with a managed IT services provider that specializes in helping the medical industry.

Call us today to discover how we can better protect you and your patients.

This post was originally published on this site

IoT security in healthcare: What you need to know

The Internet of Things (IoT) is revolutionizing the healthcare industry. By remotely capturing medical data, facilitating medication delivery, and improving healthcare accessibility, IoT devices today are changing the practice of medicine and helping save more lives. But as with any new technology, IoT also brings a slew of security risks that healthcare practices need to address.

Computing devices that contain a treasure trove of patient data are attractive targets for cybercriminals. Healthcare apps, for instance, hold plenty of sensitive information, such as Social Security numbers, prescriptions, and medical histories. Should hackers ever get a hold of this information, they could resell it on the dark web or use it to steal their victim’s identity. They could even use this information to gain direct control over other IoT equipment, which would lead to even bigger consequences.

Similarly, hackers could exploit vulnerable medical devices to infiltrate even the most secure networks. They could use compromised IoT devices to sneak ransomware and other types of malware into a network, causing service disruptions and preventing practitioners from providing responsive treatment.

To effectively defend against IoT-related risks in your healthcare practice, consider the following:

Use multifactor authentication (MFA)

MFA requires users to provide more information than just their username and password to prove their identity, such as a password or PIN, an SMS code, or a fingerprint or retina scan. By enabling MFA on your networks and devices, hackers will have a harder time accessing your accounts and sensitive data.

Encrypt your data

Another way to protect your business and your patients from a massive data breach is through encryption. Encrypting electronic health records while they’re being transmitted or kept in storage prevents hackers from intercepting and reading confidential information.

If possible, everything that is transmitted across your network should be encrypted automatically to secure communications between IoT devices.

Install intrusion prevention systems

Since most IoT attacks are delivered via the internet, intrusion prevention systems are crucial to identifying and blocking unauthorized connections to your network. When you install intrusion prevention systems, hackers who try to remotely access or shut down your IoT equipment will be stopped before they damage your systems.

Security updates

Last but not least, IoT manufacturers regularly release security patches for their gadgets. Get in the habit of downloading these updates as soon they’re rolled out, or program your devices to automatically download and update themselves to ensure their safety from the latest threats.

When it comes to security, healthcare institutions have their work cut out for them. But whether you’re dealing with hardware security, data privacy, or regulatory compliance, it’s a good idea to partner with a managed IT services provider that specializes in helping the medical industry.

Call us today to discover how we can better protect you and your patients.

This post was originally published on this site

Stop insider threats within healthcare organizations

Insider threats are anyone within your organization who has knowledge of your computer systems and who can expose your data. They can be any of your current or former associates, contractors, or employees. Insider threats are a major risk to any company, including those in the healthcare sector. Let’s take a look at five ways through which you can protect your healthcare company’s data from breaches and loss caused by them.

Educate

All healthcare employees must be educated on patient privacy, data security, and the risks associated with certain behaviors. They must also be aware of allowable uses and disclosures of protected health information (PHI). For example, some healthcare personnel may be tempted to peek into the medical records of a celebrity admitted to their hospital. You must emphasize that such behavior is strictly forbidden and that it carries corresponding penalties.

Deter

Develop and enforce policies aimed at reducing the risk of data leaks. Make sure your employees understand the repercussions of violations and privacy breaches under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. Discussing patients or PHI in public areas of the hospital, for example, can result in hefty penalties and criminal charges leading to jail time.

Detect

Healthcare organizations should implement technology that can quickly identify breaches. They also need to ensure that only authorized personnel are accessing sensitive patient data. This can be accomplished by regularly checking user access logs, as well as consistently monitoring and updating access controls. Any attempt by unauthorized personnel to access data must be penalized.

Investigate

To limit its impact, any potential privacy and security breach must be investigated promptly and thoroughly upon detection. Once the cause of the breach is identified, your organization needs to implement measures to keep breaches from happening in the future.

Train

Healthcare employees must regularly undergo comprehensive cybersecurity training, as this will turn them into an effective first line of defense against various cyber risks, including insider threats. Just because the members of your team were oriented on data privacy and security-related topics during their first day on the job doesn’t mean you should be complacent. Cybersecurity risks continue to evolve, so it pays to be vigilant and to keep your team’s knowledge updated at all times.

Encourage your IT department to provide various tips across a wide variety of cybersecurity-related topics throughout the year. Using different types of media, such as emails, printed newsletters, infographics, and even memos, to deliver these tips will make them easier to understand and keep in mind for your employees.

Protecting healthcare data from insider threats is more than just about staying compliant with industry regulations. It’s also vital to protecting the privacy of your patients and your staff, as well as the reputation of your healthcare organization.

For more information about the different ways you can keep your healthcare data secure, just give our experts a call.

This post was originally published on this site

Stop insider threats within healthcare organizations

Insider threats are anyone within your organization who has knowledge of your computer systems and who can expose your data. They can be any of your current or former associates, contractors, or employees. Insider threats are a major risk to any company, including those in the healthcare sector. Let’s take a look at five ways through which you can protect your healthcare company’s data from breaches and loss caused by them.

Educate

All healthcare employees must be educated on patient privacy, data security, and the risks associated with certain behaviors. They must also be aware of allowable uses and disclosures of protected health information (PHI). For example, some healthcare personnel may be tempted to peek into the medical records of a celebrity admitted to their hospital. You must emphasize that such behavior is strictly forbidden and that it carries corresponding penalties.

Deter

Develop and enforce policies aimed at reducing the risk of data leaks. Make sure your employees understand the repercussions of violations and privacy breaches under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. Discussing patients or PHI in public areas of the hospital, for example, can result in hefty penalties and criminal charges leading to jail time.

Detect

Healthcare organizations should implement technology that can quickly identify breaches. They also need to ensure that only authorized personnel are accessing sensitive patient data. This can be accomplished by regularly checking user access logs, as well as consistently monitoring and updating access controls. Any attempt by unauthorized personnel to access data must be penalized.

Investigate

To limit its impact, any potential privacy and security breach must be investigated promptly and thoroughly upon detection. Once the cause of the breach is identified, your organization needs to implement measures to keep breaches from happening in the future.

Train

Healthcare employees must regularly undergo comprehensive cybersecurity training, as this will turn them into an effective first line of defense against various cyber risks, including insider threats. Just because the members of your team were oriented on data privacy and security-related topics during their first day on the job doesn’t mean you should be complacent. Cybersecurity risks continue to evolve, so it pays to be vigilant and to keep your team’s knowledge updated at all times.

Encourage your IT department to provide various tips across a wide variety of cybersecurity-related topics throughout the year. Using different types of media, such as emails, printed newsletters, infographics, and even memos, to deliver these tips will make them easier to understand and keep in mind for your employees.

Protecting healthcare data from insider threats is more than just about staying compliant with industry regulations. It’s also vital to protecting the privacy of your patients and your staff, as well as the reputation of your healthcare organization.

For more information about the different ways you can keep your healthcare data secure, just give our experts a call.

This post was originally published on this site

Mobile device management: A game changer for healthcare

More hospital wireless networks are making use of mobile device management (MDM) software to monitor every device connected to their network, and for good reason, too. Here are the numerous benefits MDM offers to healthcare organizations.

Compliance

Governments have established several regulations, such as HIPAA, to protect patient records, but mobile devices are posing a major challenge to these regulations. If companies violate the rules, they can be penalized with a fine as high as $1.5 million.

The largest compliance risk associated with the use of mobile devices is data leakage. The most common example of this is an employee keeping sensitive data or footage in his or her phone and then uploading it on social media. MDM mitigates this risk by allowing system administrators to set access and usage restrictions for data and applications so employees comply with the company’s security policies.

Cost-effectiveness

Many practices are adopting bring your own device (BYOD) policies, encouraging employees to use their own tablets, computers, and smartphones for work. MDM solutions make it possible for IT administrators to remotely monitor and control these devices. But more importantly, organizations benefit from the reduced overhead and hardware costs, since they don’t have to purchase the devices for their staff.

Better device security

As long as the systems administrator uses MDM, it will be a challenge for hackers to gain access to any confidential information, regardless of where in the hospital the device is. The best MDM applications can encrypt files in a portable device and distinguish corporate data from the employee’s personal information. In the event that the employee leaves the company, the MDM software will remove corporate data on their devices, minimizing the risk of unauthorized access to protected health information. Meanwhile, if the device is lost or stolen, the MDM software can be used to fully wipe the device remotely.

Company-wide updates

One of the biggest challenges of mobile devices is it’s often difficult to keep software updates consistent throughout the company. What’s worse is that employees may put off updates because they’re on a tight schedule. However, these updates are essential in defending against the latest threats.

MDM addresses these problems with company-wide updates. When a security patch is available for business software, MDM makes it easy to track which devices are still vulnerable and lets system administrators automatically administer updates. This way, companies can secure any vulnerabilities in company-registered devices from a central location.

No changes to infrastructure

MDM applications will not demand a change in the Wi-Fi infrastructure of an organization, but if the system cannot handle all the devices logged in to the network, the support team will have difficulties managing all medical applications and individual devices. If a hospital has a strong wireless network, then there will be no need to make changes to the system.

These are just some of the advantages to having MDM in the healthcare industry. If you need more information on MDM, or if you have other technical concerns, feel free to get in touch with us today!

This post was originally published on this site

Mobile device management: A game changer for healthcare

More hospital wireless networks are making use of mobile device management (MDM) software to monitor every device connected to their network, and for good reason, too. Here are the numerous benefits MDM offers to healthcare organizations.

Compliance

Governments have established several regulations, such as HIPAA, to protect patient records, but mobile devices are posing a major challenge to these regulations. If companies violate the rules, they can be penalized with a fine as high as $1.5 million.

The largest compliance risk associated with the use of mobile devices is data leakage. The most common example of this is an employee keeping sensitive data or footage in his or her phone and then uploading it on social media. MDM mitigates this risk by allowing system administrators to set access and usage restrictions for data and applications so employees comply with the company’s security policies.

Cost-effectiveness

Many practices are adopting bring your own device (BYOD) policies, encouraging employees to use their own tablets, computers, and smartphones for work. MDM solutions make it possible for IT administrators to remotely monitor and control these devices. But more importantly, organizations benefit from the reduced overhead and hardware costs, since they don’t have to purchase the devices for their staff.

Better device security

As long as the systems administrator uses MDM, it will be a challenge for hackers to gain access to any confidential information, regardless of where in the hospital the device is. The best MDM applications can encrypt files in a portable device and distinguish corporate data from the employee’s personal information. In the event that the employee leaves the company, the MDM software will remove corporate data on their devices, minimizing the risk of unauthorized access to protected health information. Meanwhile, if the device is lost or stolen, the MDM software can be used to fully wipe the device remotely.

Company-wide updates

One of the biggest challenges of mobile devices is it’s often difficult to keep software updates consistent throughout the company. What’s worse is that employees may put off updates because they’re on a tight schedule. However, these updates are essential in defending against the latest threats.

MDM addresses these problems with company-wide updates. When a security patch is available for business software, MDM makes it easy to track which devices are still vulnerable and lets system administrators automatically administer updates. This way, companies can secure any vulnerabilities in company-registered devices from a central location.

No changes to infrastructure

MDM applications will not demand a change in the Wi-Fi infrastructure of an organization, but if the system cannot handle all the devices logged in to the network, the support team will have difficulties managing all medical applications and individual devices. If a hospital has a strong wireless network, then there will be no need to make changes to the system.

These are just some of the advantages to having MDM in the healthcare industry. If you need more information on MDM, or if you have other technical concerns, feel free to get in touch with us today!

This post was originally published on this site