Basic cybersecurity terms everyone should know

If the only cybersecurity terms you know are “virus” and “hacking,” now is the time to expand your cybersecurity vocabulary. This will enable you to better understand the variety of risks in the online world and protect your computers, data, and yourself. Here’s a short yet handy list of cybersecurity terms you should know.

Malware

For a long time, the phrase “computer virus” was misused to refer to every type of attack that intended to harm or hurt computers and networks. The more appropriate term for these harmful programs and files would be “malicious software” or “malware.” Whereas a virus is a specific type of malware that is designed to replicate itself, any software created for the purpose of destroying or unfairly accessing networks and data should be referred to as malware.

Ransomware

Don’t let all other cyberthreats ending in -ware confuse you; they are all just subcategories of malware. Currently, one of the most popular of these is “ransomware,” which is malware that encrypts valuable data until a ransom is paid.

Intrusion prevention system (IPS)

There are several ways to safeguard your network from malware, but an IPS is quickly becoming one of the nonnegotiables. An IPS sits inside your company’s firewall and looks for suspicious and malicious activity that can be halted before it can exploit or take advantage of a known vulnerability.

Social engineering

Not all types of malware rely solely on fancy computer programming. Experts agree that the majority of attacks require some form of “social engineering” to succeed. Social engineering is the act of tricking people, rather than computers, into revealing sensitive or protected information. For cybercriminals, complicated software is totally unnecessary if they can just convince potential victims that they’re a security professional who needs the victims’ password to secure their account.

Phishing

Despite often relying on face-to-face interactions, social engineering does occasionally employ more technical methods. Phishing is the act of defrauding people using an app or a website that impersonates a trustworthy or often well-known business in an attempt to obtain confidential information. Just because you received an email that says it’s from the IRS doesn’t mean that it is. Don’t take such emails at face value — always verify the source, especially if the emails are requesting your sensitive data.

Antivirus

Antivirus software is often misunderstood as a way to comprehensively secure your computers and workstations. These applications are just one piece of the cybersecurity puzzle and can only scan the drives on which they are installed for signs of well-known malware variants.

Zero-day attacks

Malware is most dangerous when it has been released but not yet discovered by cybersecurity experts. When a vulnerability is found within a piece of software, vendors will release an update to fix the gap in security. However, if cyberattackers release a piece of malware that has never been seen before, and if that malware exploits one of these holes before the vulnerability is addressed, it is called a zero-day attack.

Patch

When software developers discover a security vulnerability in their programming, they usually release a small file to update and “patch” this gap. Patches are essential to keeping your network secure from the vultures lurking on the internet. By checking for and installing patches as often as possible, you keep your software protected from the latest malware.

Redundant data

When antivirus software, patches, and intrusion prevention fail to keep your information secure, there’s only one thing that will: quarantined off-site storage. Duplicating your data offline and storing it somewhere other than your business’s workspace ensures that if there is a malware infection, you’re equipped with backups.

Our cybersecurity professionals are always available to impart more in-depth knowledge of the many different kinds of cyberthreats. Get in touch with us today and find out how we can help you with your IT security woes.

This post was originally published on this site

Basic cybersecurity terms everyone should know

If the only cybersecurity terms you know are “virus” and “hacking,” now is the time to expand your cybersecurity vocabulary. This will enable you to better understand the variety of risks in the online world and protect your computers, data, and yourself. Here’s a short yet handy list of cybersecurity terms you should know.

Malware

For a long time, the phrase “computer virus” was misused to refer to every type of attack that intended to harm or hurt computers and networks. The more appropriate term for these harmful programs and files would be “malicious software” or “malware.” Whereas a virus is a specific type of malware that is designed to replicate itself, any software created for the purpose of destroying or unfairly accessing networks and data should be referred to as malware.

Ransomware

Don’t let all other cyberthreats ending in -ware confuse you; they are all just subcategories of malware. Currently, one of the most popular of these is “ransomware,” which is malware that encrypts valuable data until a ransom is paid.

Intrusion prevention system (IPS)

There are several ways to safeguard your network from malware, but an IPS is quickly becoming one of the nonnegotiables. An IPS sits inside your company’s firewall and looks for suspicious and malicious activity that can be halted before it can exploit or take advantage of a known vulnerability.

Social engineering

Not all types of malware rely solely on fancy computer programming. Experts agree that the majority of attacks require some form of “social engineering” to succeed. Social engineering is the act of tricking people, rather than computers, into revealing sensitive or protected information. For cybercriminals, complicated software is totally unnecessary if they can just convince potential victims that they’re a security professional who needs the victims’ password to secure their account.

Phishing

Despite often relying on face-to-face interactions, social engineering does occasionally employ more technical methods. Phishing is the act of defrauding people using an app or a website that impersonates a trustworthy or often well-known business in an attempt to obtain confidential information. Just because you received an email that says it’s from the IRS doesn’t mean that it is. Don’t take such emails at face value — always verify the source, especially if the emails are requesting your sensitive data.

Antivirus

Antivirus software is often misunderstood as a way to comprehensively secure your computers and workstations. These applications are just one piece of the cybersecurity puzzle and can only scan the drives on which they are installed for signs of well-known malware variants.

Zero-day attacks

Malware is most dangerous when it has been released but not yet discovered by cybersecurity experts. When a vulnerability is found within a piece of software, vendors will release an update to fix the gap in security. However, if cyberattackers release a piece of malware that has never been seen before, and if that malware exploits one of these holes before the vulnerability is addressed, it is called a zero-day attack.

Patch

When software developers discover a security vulnerability in their programming, they usually release a small file to update and “patch” this gap. Patches are essential to keeping your network secure from the vultures lurking on the internet. By checking for and installing patches as often as possible, you keep your software protected from the latest malware.

Redundant data

When antivirus software, patches, and intrusion prevention fail to keep your information secure, there’s only one thing that will: quarantined off-site storage. Duplicating your data offline and storing it somewhere other than your business’s workspace ensures that if there is a malware infection, you’re equipped with backups.

Our cybersecurity professionals are always available to impart more in-depth knowledge of the many different kinds of cyberthreats. Get in touch with us today and find out how we can help you with your IT security woes.

This post was originally published on this site

How to mitigate Microsoft 365 security risks

Microsoft 365 has transformed the way many organizations work by enhancing workflows, collaboration, and efficiency. But like other cloud-based solutions, this line of subscription services is not immune to security risks. Here’s what your business can do to address these challenges.

Vulnerabilities in SharePoint

Businesses typically use SharePoint Online and on-premises SharePoint sites to store sensitive information like personally identifiable data. Failing to secure SharePoint content against unauthorized users is one way to expose data and your business to malicious actors. This can be critical for companies that are required to comply with stringent data privacy and protection regulations and may face serious consequences for noncompliance.

To prevent this, limit administrator-level privileges and enable encryption. Additionally, set the necessary security restrictions per user for every application.

Unprotected communication channels

Phishing attacks and malware are two of the most common ways cybercriminals infiltrate a system, but there are other paths of attack. Microsoft 365 applications like Microsoft Teams, which can connect to external networks, may serve as a medium for ransomware and other types of attack.

Train your staff to identify potentially malicious files and links. Also, offer guidelines on how to handle and route sensitive files and communication to safe locations.

Security risks in dormant applications

Organizations using Microsoft 365 often won’t use all the tools and services included in the productivity suite. You may use one or several programs like Word, Excel, and SharePoint but rarely use OneDrive. If your business has been utilizing specific programs, note that some dormant applications may be prone to attack. This is why it’s crucial to identify the apps that aren’t being used, and have an administrator tweak user settings to restrict availability on such apps.

File synchronization

Like most cloud services, Microsoft 365 allows users to automatically sync on-premises files to the cloud, such as in OneDrive. This useful feature is not without security risks, however. If a file stored locally is infected with malware, OneDrive will view the file as changed/updated and trigger a sync to the OneDrive cloud, with the infection going undetected.

Office 365 Cloud App Security, a subset of Microsoft Cloud App Security, is designed to enhance protections for Office 365 apps and provide great visibility into user activity to improve incident response efforts. Make sure your organization’s security administrators set it up on your systems so you can detect and mitigate cyber risks as soon as possible.

Cybercriminals will continue to sharpen their hacking techniques, and your organization must keep up to protect your systems, apps, and devices. Call our team of IT experts now if you want to strengthen your business IT security.

This post was originally published on this site

How to mitigate Microsoft 365 security risks

Microsoft 365 has transformed the way many organizations work by enhancing workflows, collaboration, and efficiency. But like other cloud-based solutions, this line of subscription services is not immune to security risks. Here’s what your business can do to address these challenges.

Vulnerabilities in SharePoint

Businesses typically use SharePoint Online and on-premises SharePoint sites to store sensitive information like personally identifiable data. Failing to secure SharePoint content against unauthorized users is one way to expose data and your business to malicious actors. This can be critical for companies that are required to comply with stringent data privacy and protection regulations and may face serious consequences for noncompliance.

To prevent this, limit administrator-level privileges and enable encryption. Additionally, set the necessary security restrictions per user for every application.

Unprotected communication channels

Phishing attacks and malware are two of the most common ways cybercriminals infiltrate a system, but there are other paths of attack. Microsoft 365 applications like Microsoft Teams, which can connect to external networks, may serve as a medium for ransomware and other types of attack.

Train your staff to identify potentially malicious files and links. Also, offer guidelines on how to handle and route sensitive files and communication to safe locations.

Security risks in dormant applications

Organizations using Microsoft 365 often won’t use all the tools and services included in the productivity suite. You may use one or several programs like Word, Excel, and SharePoint but rarely use OneDrive. If your business has been utilizing specific programs, note that some dormant applications may be prone to attack. This is why it’s crucial to identify the apps that aren’t being used, and have an administrator tweak user settings to restrict availability on such apps.

File synchronization

Like most cloud services, Microsoft 365 allows users to automatically sync on-premises files to the cloud, such as in OneDrive. This useful feature is not without security risks, however. If a file stored locally is infected with malware, OneDrive will view the file as changed/updated and trigger a sync to the OneDrive cloud, with the infection going undetected.

Office 365 Cloud App Security, a subset of Microsoft Cloud App Security, is designed to enhance protections for Office 365 apps and provide great visibility into user activity to improve incident response efforts. Make sure your organization’s security administrators set it up on your systems so you can detect and mitigate cyber risks as soon as possible.

Cybercriminals will continue to sharpen their hacking techniques, and your organization must keep up to protect your systems, apps, and devices. Call our team of IT experts now if you want to strengthen your business IT security.

This post was originally published on this site

If you’re experiencing a ransomware attack, try these online decryptors

While the threat of ransomware pretty much encompasses all of cyberspace nowadays, not everyone realizes that some ransomware threat responses are readily available for anyone who might need them. Take a gander at these decryptor websites, for instance. They may come in handy sometime.

The state of ransomware in 2021 so far

Businesses need to deal with ransomware both from outside and within. On one hand, there are more cybercriminals trying to infiltrate your network. On the other hand, careless and unknowing staff can easily let ransomware enter your network. For instance, employees may be tricked into providing their access credentials in phishing sites, or they may click links to websites that upload ransomware downloaders onto their machines.

The statistics are sobering. Ransomware cost businesses more than $75 billion per year. Over the past two years, ransomware attacks have increased by over 97%. And compared to the first two months of 2017, ransomware campaigns that were initiated from phishing emails increased by 109% in the same span of time this year.
According to studies, there will be a ransomware attack targeting a business every 11 seconds in 2021. That is up from every 14 seconds in 2019, and every 40 seconds in 2016. And the trend is that the rate will continue to increase over the years.

Zombie ransomware is easy to defeat

Not every type of infection is targeted to individual organizations. Some infections may result from self-propagating ransomware strains, while others may come from cyberattackers who are hoping targets become so scared that they pay up before doing any research on how dated the strain is and how to remove it.

No matter what the circumstances of your infection are, always check the following lists to see whether free decryption tools have been released to save you a world of hurt:

Prevention

But even when you can get your data back for free, getting hit with ransomware is no walk in the park. There are essentially three basic approaches to prevent ransomware:

  • First, train your employees about what they should and shouldn’t open when browsing the web and checking email.
  • Second, back up your data as often as possible to quarantined storage. As long as access to your backed-up data is extremely limited and not directly connected to your network, you should be able to restore everything in case of an infection.
  • Finally, regularly update all your software solutions (operating systems, productivity software, and antivirus). Most big-name vendors are quick to patch vulnerabilities, and you’ll prevent a large portion of infections just by staying up to date.

Whether it’s dealing with an infection or preventing one, the best option is to always seek professional advice from seasoned IT technicians. It’s possible that you could decrypt your data with the tools listed above, but most ransomware strains destroy your data after a set time limit, and you may not be able to beat the clock. And even if you do, you probably won’t have the expertise to discern where your security was penetrated.

Don’t waste time fighting a never-ending stream of cyberattacks — hand it over to us and be done with it. Call us today to find out more.

This post was originally published on this site

If you’re experiencing a ransomware attack, try these online decryptors

While the threat of ransomware pretty much encompasses all of cyberspace nowadays, not everyone realizes that some ransomware threat responses are readily available for anyone who might need them. Take a gander at these decryptor websites, for instance. They may come in handy sometime.

The state of ransomware in 2021 so far

Businesses need to deal with ransomware both from outside and within. On one hand, there are more cybercriminals trying to infiltrate your network. On the other hand, careless and unknowing staff can easily let ransomware enter your network. For instance, employees may be tricked into providing their access credentials in phishing sites, or they may click links to websites that upload ransomware downloaders onto their machines.

The statistics are sobering. Ransomware cost businesses more than $75 billion per year. Over the past two years, ransomware attacks have increased by over 97%. And compared to the first two months of 2017, ransomware campaigns that were initiated from phishing emails increased by 109% in the same span of time this year.
According to studies, there will be a ransomware attack targeting a business every 11 seconds in 2021. That is up from every 14 seconds in 2019, and every 40 seconds in 2016. And the trend is that the rate will continue to increase over the years.

Zombie ransomware is easy to defeat

Not every type of infection is targeted to individual organizations. Some infections may result from self-propagating ransomware strains, while others may come from cyberattackers who are hoping targets become so scared that they pay up before doing any research on how dated the strain is and how to remove it.

No matter what the circumstances of your infection are, always check the following lists to see whether free decryption tools have been released to save you a world of hurt:

Prevention

But even when you can get your data back for free, getting hit with ransomware is no walk in the park. There are essentially three basic approaches to prevent ransomware:

  • First, train your employees about what they should and shouldn’t open when browsing the web and checking email.
  • Second, back up your data as often as possible to quarantined storage. As long as access to your backed-up data is extremely limited and not directly connected to your network, you should be able to restore everything in case of an infection.
  • Finally, regularly update all your software solutions (operating systems, productivity software, and antivirus). Most big-name vendors are quick to patch vulnerabilities, and you’ll prevent a large portion of infections just by staying up to date.

Whether it’s dealing with an infection or preventing one, the best option is to always seek professional advice from seasoned IT technicians. It’s possible that you could decrypt your data with the tools listed above, but most ransomware strains destroy your data after a set time limit, and you may not be able to beat the clock. And even if you do, you probably won’t have the expertise to discern where your security was penetrated.

Don’t waste time fighting a never-ending stream of cyberattacks — hand it over to us and be done with it. Call us today to find out more.

This post was originally published on this site

What are the dangers of jailbreaking your iPad?

Many iPad users jailbreak their devices to gain greater control over iOS. With a jailbroken iPad, they can download apps that aren’t available in the App Store and gain more functionality. However, these unauthorized modifications often cause a variety of issues, including the following.

Security vulnerabilities

Jailbreaking removes security features designed to protect your iPad and the sensitive information it contains. So when you download and install third-party apps onto your jailbroken iPad, you may introduce malware, spyware, and viruses that can compromise your data’s security and slow down or damage your device.

Warranty issues

Although modifying your own device is perfectly legal, Apple has made it clear that jailbreaking is a violation of the iOS software license agreement. As such, any jailbroken Apple device will not be protected under their warranty service coverage. Apple may even deny service for your jailbroken iPad, so if something goes wrong with it, you’re basically on your own.

No iOS updates

Technically, you can install iOS updates onto your jailbroken iPad, but you’ll lose your jailbreak. This means you have to go through the entire jailbreaking process again and reinstall all apps and extensions. What’s more, if you decide to update your iOS, you may have to wait for an updated jailbreak version to become available, which could take days, weeks, or even months.

Device instability

Jailbreaking can cause your iPad to randomly reboot or malfunction. Also, because third-party apps can access features and protocols not available for apps designed or approved by Apple, you may find that your jailbroken iPad crashes more often or that certain apps don’t work smoothly.

Shortened battery life

The jailbreak in and of itself doesn’t affect your iPad’s battery life. Shortened battery life issues on jailbroken iPads may be caused by installed third-party apps and tweaks. Some of these, like lock screen widgets and live wallpapers, might be increasing background activity on your device and thus draining your battery faster.

Unreliable voice and data services

If you use jailbroken iPads, you may experience dropped calls and spotty data connections more frequently. This can be a major issue if you use your device for work, as unreliable voice and data services can hinder your communications with your colleagues and clients. Additionally, you may encounter some location data problems on your jailbroken device.

Now that Apple has added so many features to iOS, jailbreaking iPads is not as prevalent as it was in previous years. But if you’re still considering jailbreaking your device, keep in mind that doing so puts your iPad and data at risk.

If you want to learn more about jailbreaking or need help with your Apple devices, get in touch with our experts today.

This post was originally published on this site

What are the dangers of jailbreaking your iPad?

Many iPad users jailbreak their devices to gain greater control over iOS. With a jailbroken iPad, they can download apps that aren’t available in the App Store and gain more functionality. However, these unauthorized modifications often cause a variety of issues, including the following.

Security vulnerabilities

Jailbreaking removes security features designed to protect your iPad and the sensitive information it contains. So when you download and install third-party apps onto your jailbroken iPad, you may introduce malware, spyware, and viruses that can compromise your data’s security and slow down or damage your device.

Warranty issues

Although modifying your own device is perfectly legal, Apple has made it clear that jailbreaking is a violation of the iOS software license agreement. As such, any jailbroken Apple device will not be protected under their warranty service coverage. Apple may even deny service for your jailbroken iPad, so if something goes wrong with it, you’re basically on your own.

No iOS updates

Technically, you can install iOS updates onto your jailbroken iPad, but you’ll lose your jailbreak. This means you have to go through the entire jailbreaking process again and reinstall all apps and extensions. What’s more, if you decide to update your iOS, you may have to wait for an updated jailbreak version to become available, which could take days, weeks, or even months.

Device instability

Jailbreaking can cause your iPad to randomly reboot or malfunction. Also, because third-party apps can access features and protocols not available for apps designed or approved by Apple, you may find that your jailbroken iPad crashes more often or that certain apps don’t work smoothly.

Shortened battery life

The jailbreak in and of itself doesn’t affect your iPad’s battery life. Shortened battery life issues on jailbroken iPads may be caused by installed third-party apps and tweaks. Some of these, like lock screen widgets and live wallpapers, might be increasing background activity on your device and thus draining your battery faster.

Unreliable voice and data services

If you use jailbroken iPads, you may experience dropped calls and spotty data connections more frequently. This can be a major issue if you use your device for work, as unreliable voice and data services can hinder your communications with your colleagues and clients. Additionally, you may encounter some location data problems on your jailbroken device.

Now that Apple has added so many features to iOS, jailbreaking iPads is not as prevalent as it was in previous years. But if you’re still considering jailbreaking your device, keep in mind that doing so puts your iPad and data at risk.

If you want to learn more about jailbreaking or need help with your Apple devices, get in touch with our experts today.

This post was originally published on this site

Sneaky Android adware apps to watch out for

Zscaler’s ThreatLabZ team recently uncovered 17 adware apps in Google Play. These are apps that run unwanted ads on your device and collect your data for marketing purposes. Unfortunately, these apps were downloaded around 120,000 times before Google was able to remove them. Here’s a list of the adware apps that have been identified, and how you can avoid downloading such malicious apps in the future.

Sneaky adware apps

These potentially malicious apps are disguised as harmless system or utility apps. They pose as image editors, photo or document scanners, and even messenger apps. Their names even resemble those of legitimate system apps, chosen for the express purpose of tricking Android users into installing them onto their devices. These apps are:

  1. All Good PDF Scanner
  2. Blue Scanner
  3. Care Message
  4. Desire Translate
  5. Direct Messenger
  6. Hummingbird PDF Converter – Photo to PDF
  7. Meticulous Scanner
  8. Mint Leaf Message-Your Private Message
  9. One Sentence Translator – Multifunctional Translator
  10. Paper Doc Scanner
  11. Part Message
  12. Powerful Cleaner
  13. Private SMS
  14. Style Photo Collage
  15. Talent Photo Editor – Blur focus
  16. Tangram App Lock
  17. Unique Keyboard – Fancy Fonts & Free Emoticons

How to remove these adware apps

It’s important that you immediately remove these apps from your device to prevent them from exposing you to all kinds of IT security threats, like man-in-the-middle attacks. One way to do this is to use an anti-malware app that scans and automatically removes malicious software from your device. You can also check your phone or tablet’s app permissions to see if any questionable apps have permission to access your text messages, contact list, etc., and manually uninstall the dubious apps.

However, some apps are harder to detect because they display two different sets of names and icons — one on your device’s Settings app and another when they’re actually running. This makes it more difficult to identify and uninstall the malicious apps on your device, which is exactly what the developers want.

On the other hand, some apps appear on your app tray, but launching one triggers a message that says the app is incompatible with your device. You will then be redirected to a random page on Google Play. And when you return to your app tray, you’ll find that the app’s icon has disappeared.

If there’s no icon, how can you uninstall the app? Andrew Brandt, a researcher at Sophos, says deleting adware apps will require a little bit of digging on your part, as there’s no icon that you can click and drag to the top of the screen and into the trash.

To do this, you have to first identify the adware apps. Go to Settings > Apps & Notifications. This will direct you to a page that displays the most recently opened apps on your device. Next, check if any of those apps have the generic greenish-blue Android icon and/or have generic-sounding names such as Back Up, Update, and the like. If they do, they’re likely adware. Finally, tap the icon and then select Force Stop > Uninstall. Note that a legit system or utility app will have a Disable option instead of an Uninstall option.

There may be similar apps that are yet to be identified and are likely to be made available on Google Play in the future. The key takeaway here is to be mindful of what you download, even if it’s from Google Play or other official platforms. Check out the reviews — the reported adware apps got poor reviews from users who complained about getting a lot of pop-up ads.

Remember that malware can be hiding in even the most innocuous apps, and downloading them gives bad actors the chance to access any confidential information on your device. For advice on how to keep your Android devices safe from adware and other malicious malware, give us a call today.

This post was originally published on this site

Sneaky Android adware apps to watch out for

Zscaler’s ThreatLabZ team recently uncovered 17 adware apps in Google Play. These are apps that run unwanted ads on your device and collect your data for marketing purposes. Unfortunately, these apps were downloaded around 120,000 times before Google was able to remove them. Here’s a list of the adware apps that have been identified, and how you can avoid downloading such malicious apps in the future.

Sneaky adware apps

These potentially malicious apps are disguised as harmless system or utility apps. They pose as image editors, photo or document scanners, and even messenger apps. Their names even resemble those of legitimate system apps, chosen for the express purpose of tricking Android users into installing them onto their devices. These apps are:

  1. All Good PDF Scanner
  2. Blue Scanner
  3. Care Message
  4. Desire Translate
  5. Direct Messenger
  6. Hummingbird PDF Converter – Photo to PDF
  7. Meticulous Scanner
  8. Mint Leaf Message-Your Private Message
  9. One Sentence Translator – Multifunctional Translator
  10. Paper Doc Scanner
  11. Part Message
  12. Powerful Cleaner
  13. Private SMS
  14. Style Photo Collage
  15. Talent Photo Editor – Blur focus
  16. Tangram App Lock
  17. Unique Keyboard – Fancy Fonts & Free Emoticons

How to remove these adware apps

It’s important that you immediately remove these apps from your device to prevent them from exposing you to all kinds of IT security threats, like man-in-the-middle attacks. One way to do this is to use an anti-malware app that scans and automatically removes malicious software from your device. You can also check your phone or tablet’s app permissions to see if any questionable apps have permission to access your text messages, contact list, etc., and manually uninstall the dubious apps.

However, some apps are harder to detect because they display two different sets of names and icons — one on your device’s Settings app and another when they’re actually running. This makes it more difficult to identify and uninstall the malicious apps on your device, which is exactly what the developers want.

On the other hand, some apps appear on your app tray, but launching one triggers a message that says the app is incompatible with your device. You will then be redirected to a random page on Google Play. And when you return to your app tray, you’ll find that the app’s icon has disappeared.

If there’s no icon, how can you uninstall the app? Andrew Brandt, a researcher at Sophos, says deleting adware apps will require a little bit of digging on your part, as there’s no icon that you can click and drag to the top of the screen and into the trash.

To do this, you have to first identify the adware apps. Go to Settings > Apps & Notifications. This will direct you to a page that displays the most recently opened apps on your device. Next, check if any of those apps have the generic greenish-blue Android icon and/or have generic-sounding names such as Back Up, Update, and the like. If they do, they’re likely adware. Finally, tap the icon and then select Force Stop > Uninstall. Note that a legit system or utility app will have a Disable option instead of an Uninstall option.

There may be similar apps that are yet to be identified and are likely to be made available on Google Play in the future. The key takeaway here is to be mindful of what you download, even if it’s from Google Play or other official platforms. Check out the reviews — the reported adware apps got poor reviews from users who complained about getting a lot of pop-up ads.

Remember that malware can be hiding in even the most innocuous apps, and downloading them gives bad actors the chance to access any confidential information on your device. For advice on how to keep your Android devices safe from adware and other malicious malware, give us a call today.

This post was originally published on this site