Is Wi-Fi slow on your phone? These might be why

If you’re like most people, you rely on your smartphone for a lot of things. You might use it to check your email, browse the internet, or make phone calls. So when your phone has a slow internet connection, it can be really frustrating. In this blog post, we will discuss five of the most common causes of slow internet on mobile phones and tips on how to fix these issues.

Router location

One simple yet overlooked reason why your phone may be experiencing internet lag is because of your Wi-Fi router’s location. Although Wi-Fi has a range of up to 230 feet, the signal gets weaker the farther you are from the router. Large objects like doors and walls situated in between your phone and the router can also weaken the transmission.

It’s recommended to place your router in a centralized location, preferably away from concrete and masonry walls or other big objects like a fireplace. As the router signal radiates from all sides, if it’s blocked by even just one large object, your Wi-Fi signal will weaken significantly and, consequently, impede your phone’s internet speed.

Wi-Fi noise

Electronic appliances typically emit wireless signals at a frequency similar to your router’s, which is 2.4 GHz. So if you live in an apartment complex or have a lot of electronic devices in your home, you may experience interference that can slow down your Wi-Fi. One way to fix this is to place your router in a central location away from other electronic devices.

You can also try changing the frequency or channel that your router is broadcasting on. To do this, you will need to log in to your router’s settings page, then look for a page or tab that says “wireless settings” or “channel.” From there, you can select a different frequency. For most routers, this will be 5 GHz. But before you do this, make sure that your phone supports 5 GHz, otherwise, it won’t be able to connect to the Wi-Fi.

Fluctuating network speed

Another reason for your phone’s slow internet connection could be fluctuating network speeds. To check whether this is the cause of slow internet speeds, ask these questions:

  • How many devices are connected to the router?
  • What are these devices using the internet for?

Increase your router’s internet bandwidth speed if there are many users and all of them are either streaming movies or downloading computer games or software updates. This will allow every phone connected to your network to enjoy faster internet speeds.

Poor VPN connection

Using a virtual private network (VPN) is a great way to improve your security and privacy when browsing the internet. But if your VPN connection is slow, it can also impact the speed of your internet connection. To fix this, try connecting to a different VPN server or switching to a different VPN protocol.

You can also try disabling your VPN. This will make your browsing experience faster, but it will also make it less secure. So only do this if you are connected to a safe network, such as your home or office Wi-Fi.

Full browser cache

Your mobile browser’s cache saves data from earlier searches in order to display faster results of similar searches in the future. Although your phone becomes more efficient for that particular search, it also makes your phone much slower when you do other things that require connecting to the internet.

You can clear your cache manually or use a cache cleaner app to get rid of useless data and optimize your phone’s internet speed. If you decide to download a cache cleaner app, make sure that it is trustworthy so you don’t accidentally download a malware-infected program.

There are many reasons for your phone’s lagging internet speed. If your business relies heavily on a speedy mobile internet connection and you’re unable to fix the problem, call our experts today. We’re always ready to help you.

This post was originally published on this site

Try this tip to improve your home Wi-Fi

Home Wi-Fi connections are slower and less reliable than enterprise-grade ones. But now that more people have shifted to remote work, having a fast and stable wireless connection has become even more essential. To ensure you don’t suffer dropped Wi-Fi signals while you’re video conferencing or finishing up a report, invest in wireless repeaters and additional access points.

Both wireless repeaters and access points are simple and inexpensive, and getting either or both of these devices can improve your home Wi-Fi connection.

Wireless repeaters are devices that extend the limited reach that Wi-Fi routers tend to have, especially in structures with thick walls and multiple floors. They receive a signal from a Wi-Fi router and rebroadcast it as a new network. This new network is an extension of the main network, enabling the signal from your router to be transmitted over long distances or to the other side of obstructions, such as a wall, post, or ductwork.

On the other hand, access points are devices that allow wireless devices to connect to a network. Your router at home is actually an access point, and while most access points have built-in routers, others have to be connected to a router. Access points are usually hardwired to network switches or modems.

Getting started

Before you go out and buy these devices, conduct a survey of the Wi-Fi signal throughout your home first. This will help you map out where to place repeaters and access points to maximize your Wi-Fi connection. This involves:

Determining the reach of your router. Use a Wi-Fi analyzer app, such as NetSpot, Wifi Analyzer, or OpenSignal.
Locating dead zones, or areas that don’t get a Wi-Fi signal, in your house. This can usually be solved by moving your router or modem to an area where the signal is better.
Checking for obstructions (e.g., walls, furniture, plastics, water, etc.) and sources of interference (e.g., baby monitors, microwave ovens, radios, etc.). Any of these may be blocking or slowing down your Wi-Fi connection.

Based on your analysis, identify the best places to put the repeater and access point. For instance, if your router is in the living room and you can’t get a good signal in your bedroom down the hall, place the access point outside the living room and the repeater in the bedroom. The signal will be extended by the access point and picked up by the repeater, which will then broadcast it to nearby devices. Note that wireless repeaters must be set up in areas where the signal is poor, not in dead zones.

Setting up wireless repeaters and access points

Most brands and models of wireless repeaters and access points follow the same setup process.

Wireless repeaters

  1. Choose a location free from obstructions that can block signals from your Wi-Fi router.
  2. Plug the repeater into a power outlet.
  3. Using an Ethernet cable, connect the repeater directly to a computer. You can also connect the computer to the repeater’s wireless network.
  4. On your computer, enter your Wi-Fi network’s password.
  5. Any other steps to setting up your wireless repeater should be in the manufacturer’s instructions.

Access points

  1. Choose a location free from obstructions that can block signals from your Wi-Fi router.
  2. Turn off your router or modem and computer. Connect your access point to your router or modem and to your computer using an Ethernet cable.
  3. Turn on your router or modem, and plug the access point into an electrical outlet.
  4. Turn on your computer, and start enjoying better Wi-Fi performance.
  5. Any other steps to setting up your access point should be in the manufacturer’s instructions.
  6. You can also change optional and advanced router settings by connecting to your router using the IP address provided in the manual, or either 192.168.0.1 or 192.168.1.1.

If you need more information about setting up and getting the most out of your wireless network, whether at home or in the office, get in touch with our experts today.

This post was originally published on this site

Rectify these 5 Wi-Fi issues with ease

Your business has spent a lot on Wi-Fi routers so your employees can collaborate instantaneously and access files seamlessly without your connection faltering. But when your Wi-Fi starts acting up, resist the temptation to smash your router. Instead, try these simple troubleshooting techniques.

Range constraints

Wi-Fi works via radio waves that are typically broadcast from a device known as a router. To avoid a weak signal in your office, make sure that your router is placed in a centralized location and not hidden in the farthest corner of your facility. The Wi-Fi antennas must also be either in a fully horizontal or vertical position for optimal signal distribution.

Note that Wi-Fi range constraints can also be due to interference, so if your office is situated in a highly populated area, try changing your router’s channel.

Slow internet speed

Despite having high-speed or fiber optic internet, slow load times can still occur from time to time. To eliminate this, try the following:

  • Place your router in the same room as your computers.
  • Add more routers to better accommodate a high number of connected devices.
  • Limit the use of bandwidth-intensive applications and websites such as Skype, Dropbox, YouTube, and Facebook.
  • Disable your router’s power-saving mode.
  • Create a new router channel to avoid network bottlenecks.

Connection issues

It can be frustrating when the Wi-Fi network shows up on your device but you just can’t seem to connect to it. To solve this issue, try these fixes:

  • Determine whether your Wi-Fi connection or internet service is the problem. To do this, plug in an Ethernet cable directly to your laptop. If you get a connection, then the issue is on your end.
  • Reset your router. Use a paperclip or a pen to hold down the reset button for about 30 seconds.
  • Reboot your device.
  • Call your internet service provider if none of these fixes work.

Unstable connection

Random Wi-Fi connection drops can happen occasionally. If this is a constant nuisance in your office, try moving your router to a different spot or room. Avoid having multiple routers in the same location as well, as this can confuse your device.

Network not found

Your Wi-Fi network may not appear on your devices if your router is glitching. To fix this issue, try disconnecting the router from the power source and waiting at least 30 seconds before reconnecting it. You may also need to check how old your router is. If it’s more than three years old, then that may be what’s causing the connectivity problems. Replacing your router with a newer model should solve the issue.

Implementing these tips will help you avoid serious downtime caused by Wi-Fi issues. However, if you prefer to have a dedicated technology provider handle these for you, give us a call and we’ll be happy to help.

This post was originally published on this site