Windows 10 and 11 keyboard shortcuts you need to know

Using keyboard shortcuts activate computer commands faster than dragging a mouse. If you’re using Windows 10 or 11, you may want to try out the following keyboard shortcuts.

Snap

Snap allows you to put two to four windows side by side, making it easier to compare documents or do two things at the same time. You can use Snap with these keyboard shortcuts:

  • Windows Key + Left – snaps the current window to the left side of the screen
  • Windows Key + Right – snaps the current window to the right side of the screen
  • Windows Key + Alt + Up (Windows 11 only) – snaps the current window to the top half of the screen
  • Windows Key + Alt + Down (Windows 11 only) – snaps the current window to the bottom half of the screen

You can also select a snapped window and press Windows Key + Up/Down to move it to your desired corner of the screen.

Taskbar

You can also use keyboard shortcuts to navigate the Windows 10 or 11 taskbar. Here are the ones you need to know:

  • Windows Key + T – cycle through opened and pinned apps on the taskbar
  • Windows Key + (number) – open the app pinned to the taskbar in the position indicated by the number. If the app is already running, pressing this shortcut will switch to that app.
  • Windows Key + Shift + (number) – start a new instance of the app pinned to the taskbar in the position indicated by the number, even if one is already open

Task View

This window management feature allows you to see all of your opened windows and browser tabs so you can quickly return to a specific program, document, or web page. This is particularly useful if you have multiple windows open at once.

You can access Task View by clicking on its button on the taskbar or using these keyboard shortcuts:

  • Windows Key + Tab – opens the Task View interface with windows from your current desktop
  • Alt + Tab – switches between open windows and browser tabs on all desktops
  • Ctrl + Alt + Tab – functions similarly to Alt + Tab but the thumbnails stay on the screen even after you release all the keys

Virtual Desktop

This handy feature enables you to create a new desktop that can display different open windows and apps. You can dedicate virtual desktops for certain functions. For instance, one virtual desktop could be used solely for work and another one for entertainment.

You can quickly manage your virtual desktops using the following keyboard shortcuts:

  • Windows Key + Ctrl + D – opens a new virtual desktop
  • Windows Key + Ctrl + F4 – closes the current virtual desktop
  • Windows Key + Ctrl + Left/Right – switches to the virtual desktop on the left or right

If you’re looking for more time-saving technology tips or have any questions about how Windows 10 or 11 can help streamline your operations, just give us a call. Our IT experts are more than happy to assist you.

This post was originally published on this site

Cutting IT hardware costs with thin and zero clients

If you want to cut costs on IT hardware, don’t settle for cheap but old or low-quality machines. They’ll offer subpar performance, which will hurt your team’s productivity. What’s worse, they’ll break down often, too, which means the money you initially saved will go to repairs and upgrades. Instead of buying low-end machines, you should consider buying thin or zero clients.

What are thin and zero clients?

Thin clients are stripped-down computers with minimum processing power and memory. They rely on a basic operating system (OS) and a network connection to access a more powerful server where almost all computing processes take place. This server must be purchased separately or rented out in the cloud.

Zero clients work the same way as thin clients. The only difference is that there’s no local storage or OS installed on the device; all the software, storage, and processing power sits on a server until you need it. In intensively cloud-based systems, utilizing zero clients is ideal for cutting costs.

What are the benefits of using thin and zero clients?

Thin and zero clients offer a whole host of benefits, such as:

Reduced hardware costs

If you want computers with low upfront costs, choose thin and zero clients. Conventional desktops start at $600 per user, while thin clients can go as low as $250 per user. And since they have no hard drive or other moving parts, the latter tend to be more durable and have a longer life span than their traditional counterparts.

Minimized security risks

Thin and zero clients also help you prevent costly malware attacks and data breach incidents. They reduce security risks by having no facility for holding apps. That is, users can’t install any risky and unvetted programs on these machines. Furthermore, thin and zero clients limit direct access to the OS. This prevents employees from copying sensitive data to removable media and installing software, malicious or otherwise, on the clients’ server.

If your thin or zero client is damaged or corrupted, you don’t have to worry about your data, as it’s stored in a separate server.

Simplified IT management

Another benefit of thin and zero clients is that they can be managed by your IT team or managed IT services provider from a server. Suppose a new software update is released. Instead of manually downloading the patch on each computer, you can simply install the update on your server and roll it out to all the clients. Apart from installing updates, you can also make backups, security configurations, and application deployments in the data center. This quickens setup, reduces downtime, and increases employee productivity.

Decreased energy consumption

Traditional desktops process data locally, thereby requiring more power and generating more heat than thin or zero clients. This results in huge power and cooling bills. In contrast, thin and zero clients consume only 4 to 6.5 watts of power, almost 1/50th of thick client requirements. They also require little to no cooling, allowing you to enjoy significant cost savings. And, as a bonus, they’re practically silent, which makes them conducive to a more relaxing work environment.

Do not overlook thin and zero clients if you’re searching for ways to cut costs without compromising outcomes. The reduced hardware costs, power bills, and security risks are just too good to pass up.

If you’re still unsure about this technology, give us a call. We’ll assess your tech needs and determine whether or not thin or zero clients can help you succeed.

This post was originally published on this site

Keyboard shortcuts you can use in Windows 10

Technology makes work easier, and something as simple as keyboard shortcuts can save you a lot of time. If you have a Windows 10 computer, then you may find these keyboard shortcuts very handy.

Snap

If you’ve never used Snap, then you’re missing out on one of Windows 10’s key features. Snap allows you to put two to four windows side by side, making it easier to compare documents or do two things at the same time. You can use Snap with these keyboard shortcuts:

  • Windows Key + Left – Snaps the current window to the left side of the screen
  • Windows Key + Right – Snaps the current window to the right side of the screen

You can also select a snapped window and press Windows Key + Up/Down to move it to your desired corner of the screen.

Task View

This window management feature allows you to see all of your opened windows and browser tabs so you can quickly return to a specific program, document, or web page. This is particularly useful if you have multiple windows open at once.

You can access Task View by clicking on its button on the taskbar or using these keyboard shortcuts:

  • Windows Key + Tab – Opens the Task View interface with windows from your current desktop
  • Alt + Tab – Switches between open windows and browser tabs on all virtual desktops
  • Ctrl + Alt + Tab – Functions similarly to Alt + Tab but the thumbnails stay on the screen even after you release all the keys

Virtual Desktop

This nifty feature enables you to create a new desktop that can display different open windows and apps. You can dedicate virtual desktops for certain functions. For instance, one virtual desktop could be used solely for work and another one for entertainment.

You can quickly manage your virtual desktops using the following keyboard shortcuts:

  • Windows Key + Ctrl + D – Opens a new virtual desktop
  • Windows Key + Ctrl + F4 – Closes the current virtual desktop
  • Windows Key + Ctrl + Left/Right – Switches to the virtual desktop on the left or right

If you’re looking for more time-saving technology tips or have any questions about how Windows 10 can help streamline your operations, just give us a call. Our IT experts are more than happy to assist you.

This post was originally published on this site

Keyboard shortcuts you can use in Windows 10

Technology makes work easier, and something as simple as keyboard shortcuts can save you a lot of time. If you have a Windows 10 computer, then you may find these keyboard shortcuts very handy.

Snap

If you’ve never used Snap, then you’re missing out on one of Windows 10’s key features. Snap allows you to put two to four windows side by side, making it easier to compare documents or do two things at the same time. You can use Snap with these keyboard shortcuts:

  • Windows Key + Left – Snaps the current window to the left side of the screen
  • Windows Key + Right – Snaps the current window to the right side of the screen

You can also select a snapped window and press Windows Key + Up/Down to move it to your desired corner of the screen.

Task View

This window management feature allows you to see all of your opened windows and browser tabs so you can quickly return to a specific program, document, or web page. This is particularly useful if you have multiple windows open at once.

You can access Task View by clicking on its button on the taskbar or using these keyboard shortcuts:

  • Windows Key + Tab – Opens the Task View interface with windows from your current desktop
  • Alt + Tab – Switches between open windows and browser tabs on all virtual desktops
  • Ctrl + Alt + Tab – Functions similarly to Alt + Tab but the thumbnails stay on the screen even after you release all the keys

Virtual Desktop

This nifty feature enables you to create a new desktop that can display different open windows and apps. You can dedicate virtual desktops for certain functions. For instance, one virtual desktop could be used solely for work and another one for entertainment.

You can quickly manage your virtual desktops using the following keyboard shortcuts:

  • Windows Key + Ctrl + D – Opens a new virtual desktop
  • Windows Key + Ctrl + F4 – Closes the current virtual desktop
  • Windows Key + Ctrl + Left/Right – Switches to the virtual desktop on the left or right

If you’re looking for more time-saving technology tips or have any questions about how Windows 10 can help streamline your operations, just give us a call. Our IT experts are more than happy to assist you.

This post was originally published on this site