Is Wi-Fi slow on your phone? These might be why

If you’re like most people, you rely on your smartphone for a lot of things. You might use it to check your email, browse the internet, or make phone calls. So when your phone has a slow internet connection, it can be really frustrating. In this blog post, we will discuss five of the most common causes of slow internet on mobile phones and tips on how to fix these issues.

Router location

One simple yet overlooked reason why your phone may be experiencing internet lag is because of your Wi-Fi router’s location. Although Wi-Fi has a range of up to 230 feet, the signal gets weaker the farther you are from the router. Large objects like doors and walls situated in between your phone and the router can also weaken the transmission.

It’s recommended to place your router in a centralized location, preferably away from concrete and masonry walls or other big objects like a fireplace. As the router signal radiates from all sides, if it’s blocked by even just one large object, your Wi-Fi signal will weaken significantly and, consequently, impede your phone’s internet speed.

Wi-Fi noise

Electronic appliances typically emit wireless signals at a frequency similar to your router’s, which is 2.4 GHz. So if you live in an apartment complex or have a lot of electronic devices in your home, you may experience interference that can slow down your Wi-Fi. One way to fix this is to place your router in a central location away from other electronic devices.

You can also try changing the frequency or channel that your router is broadcasting on. To do this, you will need to log in to your router’s settings page, then look for a page or tab that says “wireless settings” or “channel.” From there, you can select a different frequency. For most routers, this will be 5 GHz. But before you do this, make sure that your phone supports 5 GHz, otherwise, it won’t be able to connect to the Wi-Fi.

Fluctuating network speed

Another reason for your phone’s slow internet connection could be fluctuating network speeds. To check whether this is the cause of slow internet speeds, ask these questions:

  • How many devices are connected to the router?
  • What are these devices using the internet for?

Increase your router’s internet bandwidth speed if there are many users and all of them are either streaming movies or downloading computer games or software updates. This will allow every phone connected to your network to enjoy faster internet speeds.

Poor VPN connection

Using a virtual private network (VPN) is a great way to improve your security and privacy when browsing the internet. But if your VPN connection is slow, it can also impact the speed of your internet connection. To fix this, try connecting to a different VPN server or switching to a different VPN protocol.

You can also try disabling your VPN. This will make your browsing experience faster, but it will also make it less secure. So only do this if you are connected to a safe network, such as your home or office Wi-Fi.

Full browser cache

Your mobile browser’s cache saves data from earlier searches in order to display faster results of similar searches in the future. Although your phone becomes more efficient for that particular search, it also makes your phone much slower when you do other things that require connecting to the internet.

You can clear your cache manually or use a cache cleaner app to get rid of useless data and optimize your phone’s internet speed. If you decide to download a cache cleaner app, make sure that it is trustworthy so you don’t accidentally download a malware-infected program.

There are many reasons for your phone’s lagging internet speed. If your business relies heavily on a speedy mobile internet connection and you’re unable to fix the problem, call our experts today. We’re always ready to help you.

This post was originally published on this site

6 Crucial battery-saving tips for iPhone users

If you’re working out of the office or house, you never want your iPhone to run out of battery. A dead smartphone can mean missing important calls and being unable to send crucial updates to the team. But with the tips below, you can avoid these issues in the first place.

1. Activate Low Power Mode

When you switch on Low Power Mode, it automatically adjusts several settings to extend the life of your battery. For starters, it reduces the brightness of your screen and the amount of battery power your apps are using. It also disables the automatic fetching of new email and it powers off the display more quickly. To activate Low Power Mode, press Settings > Battery and then tap Low Power Mode.

2. Lower the screen brightness

The brighter your iPhone screen, the more battery it drains. To adjust your screen brightness, flick the Control Center tab upward from the bottom of your screen. There, you’ll see a horizontal line with a circle in the middle and a sun symbol to the side of both ends. Move the circle left or right to adjust the brightness.

Alternatively, you can adjust your iPhone’s brightness in Settings > Display & Brightness. On this screen, you also can turn off Auto-Brightness, which automatically adjusts the brightness of your phone. When you turn this setting off, you’ll be certain that your phone is not wasting any battery power due to excessive screen brightness.

3. Switch off Wi-Fi

Enabling Wi-Fi can be a huge battery drain depending on the location. For instance, if you’re at home, Wi-Fi will use less battery. But when you’re on the go, your phone is often searching for a Wi-Fi signal to connect to, which drains the battery. So if you can hold off on your mobile browsing and email till you get home or to the office, your phone will stay powered on longer.

4. Switch off cellular data

Like Wi-Fi, cellular data can also consume battery quickly, especially if you’re in an area where there’s no cellular coverage. When this happens, your phone begins to constantly search for a signal, and this consumes a lot of power. So if you’re short on battery and don’t need data, turn off your cellular data function. Doing this can easily provide an extra hour or two of additional battery life.

5. Activate airplane mode

Desperate times call for desperate measures, and this is exactly when you need airplane mode. If you are down to 20 percent battery life and need your phone to last for a few hours longer, airplane mode may help. By switching it on, your phone will shut down all wireless activity, including cellular, Bluetooth, and Wi-Fi.

Doing this is obviously not ideal, but if you have little battery life and want your phone available in case of emergencies, this is your best option (next to switching it off). You can also turn on wireless functions like Bluetooth or Wi-Fi individually while staying in airplane mode.

You can switch to airplane mode from the Control Center screen or by going to Settings and then clicking on Airplane mode.

6. Use a power bank

Buying a power bank to charge your phone remotely is a great option if you intend to continue using Wi-Fi, cellular data, and other high-powered settings for long hours. These devices are continually becoming lighter and smaller, so it’s no longer a hassle to carry them around. You can simply slide a power bank into your pocket and use it when needed.

If you’re looking for more ways to get the most out of your iPhone or are looking to service your Apple technology, feel free to contact us. We’re happy to help in any way possible.

This post was originally published on this site

Try this tip to improve your home Wi-Fi

Home Wi-Fi connections are slower and less reliable than enterprise-grade ones. But now that more people have shifted to remote work, having a fast and stable wireless connection has become even more essential. To ensure you don’t suffer dropped Wi-Fi signals while you’re video conferencing or finishing up a report, invest in wireless repeaters and additional access points.

Both wireless repeaters and access points are simple and inexpensive, and getting either or both of these devices can improve your home Wi-Fi connection.

Wireless repeaters are devices that extend the limited reach that Wi-Fi routers tend to have, especially in structures with thick walls and multiple floors. They receive a signal from a Wi-Fi router and rebroadcast it as a new network. This new network is an extension of the main network, enabling the signal from your router to be transmitted over long distances or to the other side of obstructions, such as a wall, post, or ductwork.

On the other hand, access points are devices that allow wireless devices to connect to a network. Your router at home is actually an access point, and while most access points have built-in routers, others have to be connected to a router. Access points are usually hardwired to network switches or modems.

Getting started

Before you go out and buy these devices, conduct a survey of the Wi-Fi signal throughout your home first. This will help you map out where to place repeaters and access points to maximize your Wi-Fi connection. This involves:

Determining the reach of your router. Use a Wi-Fi analyzer app, such as NetSpot, Wifi Analyzer, or OpenSignal.
Locating dead zones, or areas that don’t get a Wi-Fi signal, in your house. This can usually be solved by moving your router or modem to an area where the signal is better.
Checking for obstructions (e.g., walls, furniture, plastics, water, etc.) and sources of interference (e.g., baby monitors, microwave ovens, radios, etc.). Any of these may be blocking or slowing down your Wi-Fi connection.

Based on your analysis, identify the best places to put the repeater and access point. For instance, if your router is in the living room and you can’t get a good signal in your bedroom down the hall, place the access point outside the living room and the repeater in the bedroom. The signal will be extended by the access point and picked up by the repeater, which will then broadcast it to nearby devices. Note that wireless repeaters must be set up in areas where the signal is poor, not in dead zones.

Setting up wireless repeaters and access points

Most brands and models of wireless repeaters and access points follow the same setup process.

Wireless repeaters

  1. Choose a location free from obstructions that can block signals from your Wi-Fi router.
  2. Plug the repeater into a power outlet.
  3. Using an Ethernet cable, connect the repeater directly to a computer. You can also connect the computer to the repeater’s wireless network.
  4. On your computer, enter your Wi-Fi network’s password.
  5. Any other steps to setting up your wireless repeater should be in the manufacturer’s instructions.

Access points

  1. Choose a location free from obstructions that can block signals from your Wi-Fi router.
  2. Turn off your router or modem and computer. Connect your access point to your router or modem and to your computer using an Ethernet cable.
  3. Turn on your router or modem, and plug the access point into an electrical outlet.
  4. Turn on your computer, and start enjoying better Wi-Fi performance.
  5. Any other steps to setting up your access point should be in the manufacturer’s instructions.
  6. You can also change optional and advanced router settings by connecting to your router using the IP address provided in the manual, or either 192.168.0.1 or 192.168.1.1.

If you need more information about setting up and getting the most out of your wireless network, whether at home or in the office, get in touch with our experts today.

This post was originally published on this site

Stay connected with a UPS for networking equipment

An uninterrupted power supply (UPS) is an essential component of a business’s IT network. It ensures that networking equipment stays operational during power outages or failures. This allows you to stay online so you don’t suffer the productivity- and profit-draining impacts of a power outage, especially one that happens without warning. Learn more about UPS systems and why they’re invaluable to businesses of all sizes.

UPS for network equipment

Also known as a battery backup, a UPS provides backup power in case of outages. It also protects against power surges, which don’t just damage computers, but also make you lose unsaved work.

Deploying UPS units for Wi-Fi routers and modems allows you to stay connected to the internet when the power goes out unexpectedly. This strategy works particularly well if your employees use laptops, as that means you only need power for your Wi-Fi gear.

UPS-supported modems or routers help you stay online for as long as 90 minutes, which should be enough time to get your bearings before power finally runs out. With a UPS, you will still have a fast, reliable Wi-Fi connection so you can perform your tasks, save important files, and keep serving customers.

Without a UPS, your staff may have to rely on cellular data to do their work, which is not only less reliable than Wi-Fi, but also more expensive. You may even incur additional telecom costs resulting from overreliance on cellular data.

UPS systems vs. generators

Although generators are indispensable for certain businesses, they also require greater upkeep. If you invest in generators, you’ll need to employ an entire team to manage these pieces of high-maintenance equipment. This may not be something that a small- or medium-sized business can afford.

That said, generators can prove useful during extended blackouts, but UPS systems should be enough to keep your business running in the event of an emergency.

What’s more, misusing or mishandling generators can result in fatalities. On the other hand, if you misuse a UPS unit or if it breaks down, the worst that could happen is you lose a day’s work; it’s unlikely that you’ll experience anything life-threatening.

Plug in your network gear now

If your business doesn’t have locations in disaster-prone areas, you probably haven’t given much thought to installing UPS systems for your desktop computers, let alone your modems and routers. But accidents and emergencies are inevitable — and when they happen, you’ll find that having internet access is one of the most important things you need to ensure business continuity.

Think of a UPS as an investment that not just protects your systems from data loss, but also keeps your network equipment functioning in emergency situations.

To learn more about UPS systems and network equipment as well as backup and disaster recovery planning, give our team of IT experts a call today.

This post was originally published on this site

4 Main culprits of slow internet on your smartphone

Are the apps or websites you visit on your mobile phone loading more slowly than usual? If you’re encountering such problems, the issue likely has to do with your internet connection than with your device. Take a look at the four main culprits of a slow internet connection on your mobile device.

Wi-Fi noise

Did you know that home electronic appliances emit wireless signals at a frequency similar to your router’s (2.4 GHz)? So when deciding where to place your router, determine whether there are any electronic devices nearby, as they emit signals that can interfere with your router’s signal. For example, even if the ideal location for your router is in the middle of your house, you shouldn’t place it there if a cordless phone is nearby.

You can also set your router on a 5 GHz band, as this frequency is less prone to interference from other appliances. But before you start tuning it, make sure your phone supports 5 GHz; otherwise, it won’t be able to connect to the router.

Router location

One simple yet overlooked reason why your Wi-Fi-connected phone may be experiencing internet lag is because of your router’s location. Although Wi-Fi has a range of up to 230 feet, the signal gets weaker the farther you are from the router. Large objects like doors and walls situated in between your phone and the router can also weaken the transmission.

It’s recommended to place your router in a centralized location, preferably away from concrete and masonry walls or other big objects like a chimney. As the router signal radiates from all sides, blocking any side with big objects will impact your Wi-Fi’s signal quality, and consequently impede your phone’s internet speed.

Slow network

Another reason for your phone’s slow internet connection could be fluctuating network speeds. Ask yourself these two questions to discover the cause of this problem:

  1. How many devices are connected to the router?
  2. What are these devices using the internet for?

You should increase your router’s internet bandwidth speed if you discover you have many users and all of them are either streaming movies or downloading computer games or software updates. This will allow every phone connected to your network to enjoy faster internet speeds.

If you’re outdoors and connected to a public Wi-Fi network, consider using your mobile data instead. You won’t have to share your internet when you use mobile data, enabling you to experience faster connectivity at all times as long as you have a high-speed data plan.

Too much cache

Last, check your smartphone’s cache if fixing your router, network, and positioning doesn’t improve your device’s internet speed. Your phone’s cache saves data from earlier searches in order to display faster results of similar searches in the future. Although your phone becomes more efficient for that particular search, it also makes your phone much slower when you do other things that require the internet.

You can clear out your cache manually or use a cache cleaner app to get rid of useless cache and optimize your phone’s internet speed. If you decide to download a cache cleaner app, make sure that it is trustworthy so you don’t accidentally download a malware-infected program.

There are more reasons for your phone’s lagging internet speed. If your business relies heavily on a speedy mobile internet connection and you’re unable to fix the problem, call our experts today. We’re always ready to help you.

This post was originally published on this site

4 Main culprits of slow internet on your smartphone

Are the apps or websites you visit on your mobile phone loading more slowly than usual? If you’re encountering such problems, the issue likely has to do with your internet connection than with your device. Take a look at the four main culprits of a slow internet connection on your mobile device.

Wi-Fi noise

Did you know that home electronic appliances emit wireless signals at a frequency similar to your router’s (2.4 GHz)? So when deciding where to place your router, determine whether there are any electronic devices nearby, as they emit signals that can interfere with your router’s signal. For example, even if the ideal location for your router is in the middle of your house, you shouldn’t place it there if a cordless phone is nearby.

You can also set your router on a 5 GHz band, as this frequency is less prone to interference from other appliances. But before you start tuning it, make sure your phone supports 5 GHz; otherwise, it won’t be able to connect to the router.

Router location

One simple yet overlooked reason why your Wi-Fi-connected phone may be experiencing internet lag is because of your router’s location. Although Wi-Fi has a range of up to 230 feet, the signal gets weaker the farther you are from the router. Large objects like doors and walls situated in between your phone and the router can also weaken the transmission.

It’s recommended to place your router in a centralized location, preferably away from concrete and masonry walls or other big objects like a chimney. As the router signal radiates from all sides, blocking any side with big objects will impact your Wi-Fi’s signal quality, and consequently impede your phone’s internet speed.

Slow network

Another reason for your phone’s slow internet connection could be fluctuating network speeds. Ask yourself these two questions to discover the cause of this problem:

  1. How many devices are connected to the router?
  2. What are these devices using the internet for?

You should increase your router’s internet bandwidth speed if you discover you have many users and all of them are either streaming movies or downloading computer games or software updates. This will allow every phone connected to your network to enjoy faster internet speeds.

If you’re outdoors and connected to a public Wi-Fi network, consider using your mobile data instead. You won’t have to share your internet when you use mobile data, enabling you to experience faster connectivity at all times as long as you have a high-speed data plan.

Too much cache

Last, check your smartphone’s cache if fixing your router, network, and positioning doesn’t improve your device’s internet speed. Your phone’s cache saves data from earlier searches in order to display faster results of similar searches in the future. Although your phone becomes more efficient for that particular search, it also makes your phone much slower when you do other things that require the internet.

You can clear out your cache manually or use a cache cleaner app to get rid of useless cache and optimize your phone’s internet speed. If you decide to download a cache cleaner app, make sure that it is trustworthy so you don’t accidentally download a malware-infected program.

There are more reasons for your phone’s lagging internet speed. If your business relies heavily on a speedy mobile internet connection and you’re unable to fix the problem, call our experts today. We’re always ready to help you.

This post was originally published on this site