Windows 10 and 11 keyboard shortcuts you need to know

Using keyboard shortcuts activate computer commands faster than dragging a mouse. If you’re using Windows 10 or 11, you may want to try out the following keyboard shortcuts.

Snap

Snap allows you to put two to four windows side by side, making it easier to compare documents or do two things at the same time. You can use Snap with these keyboard shortcuts:

  • Windows Key + Left – snaps the current window to the left side of the screen
  • Windows Key + Right – snaps the current window to the right side of the screen
  • Windows Key + Alt + Up (Windows 11 only) – snaps the current window to the top half of the screen
  • Windows Key + Alt + Down (Windows 11 only) – snaps the current window to the bottom half of the screen

You can also select a snapped window and press Windows Key + Up/Down to move it to your desired corner of the screen.

Taskbar

You can also use keyboard shortcuts to navigate the Windows 10 or 11 taskbar. Here are the ones you need to know:

  • Windows Key + T – cycle through opened and pinned apps on the taskbar
  • Windows Key + (number) – open the app pinned to the taskbar in the position indicated by the number. If the app is already running, pressing this shortcut will switch to that app.
  • Windows Key + Shift + (number) – start a new instance of the app pinned to the taskbar in the position indicated by the number, even if one is already open

Task View

This window management feature allows you to see all of your opened windows and browser tabs so you can quickly return to a specific program, document, or web page. This is particularly useful if you have multiple windows open at once.

You can access Task View by clicking on its button on the taskbar or using these keyboard shortcuts:

  • Windows Key + Tab – opens the Task View interface with windows from your current desktop
  • Alt + Tab – switches between open windows and browser tabs on all desktops
  • Ctrl + Alt + Tab – functions similarly to Alt + Tab but the thumbnails stay on the screen even after you release all the keys

Virtual Desktop

This handy feature enables you to create a new desktop that can display different open windows and apps. You can dedicate virtual desktops for certain functions. For instance, one virtual desktop could be used solely for work and another one for entertainment.

You can quickly manage your virtual desktops using the following keyboard shortcuts:

  • Windows Key + Ctrl + D – opens a new virtual desktop
  • Windows Key + Ctrl + F4 – closes the current virtual desktop
  • Windows Key + Ctrl + Left/Right – switches to the virtual desktop on the left or right

If you’re looking for more time-saving technology tips or have any questions about how Windows 10 or 11 can help streamline your operations, just give us a call. Our IT experts are more than happy to assist you.

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Simplify logging in with Windows Hello

You can now log in faster and more securely to your Windows 10- or 11-powered device with Microsoft’s Windows Hello. This feature allows you to log in to your computer without having to enter a password. All you need is a fingerprint, iris, or facial scan, or a PIN code.

How to set up Windows Hello

To get started with Windows Hello, click the Start menu icon and open Settings. From there, choose Accounts, followed by Sign-in options. You should see options for setting your PIN or scanning your face, iris, or fingerprint. Select which method you want to set up and follow the prompts to create a login profile.

You can even save your biometric data or scan more than once to boost accuracy. The system collects more data every time you scan, so it’s better to complete a few scans before enabling the login feature.

After setting up your account, you can start adding other trusted users who share the same device. Each of them can set up their own PIN or biometric profile in a separate account. Passwords and PIN codes can be used as backup login options in case the camera or fingerprint scanner aren’t working.

Limited availability

As of this writing, Windows Hello is only available on select Windows 10 and 11 laptops and tablets. To see which devices have Windows Hello, go to the Windows website, scroll down to the “Filter by” section, then select the Windows Hello option under the “Features” column. The resulting selection lists devices that have the infrared camera and/or fingerprint scanner required to enable this feature.

Microsoft’s promise of security

Your Windows Hello login info is saved only on your device and never on Microsoft’s servers. Furthermore, Microsoft assures users that third parties cannot access locally saved PIN codes and biometric data. All of this means that you never need to worry about your login info falling into the wrong hands.

In addition to Windows Hello, there are other Windows features that can make your life easier. Our IT experts can help you get more out of your Windows devices. Contact us today!

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Read this before upgrading to Windows 11

Windows 11 is out. And with its sleek design and new features, it’s no wonder that so many people are considering upgrading. But should you switch to the newest Microsoft operating system (OS)? Here are some reasons why you may want to wait.

1. Your computer doesn’t meet Windows 11 minimum system requirements

One of the main reasons that can keep you from upgrading to Windows 11 is that your computer might not be able to run it. Windows 11’s system requirements are quite high: your computer needs 1 gigahertz (GHz) or faster with two or more cores on a compatible 64-bit processor or system on a chip (SoC). It also needs at least 4 gigabytes (GB) of RAM and 64 GB of available storage.

Although these standards aren’t extraordinary, a considerable number of users have outdated hardware that doesn’t meet Microsoft’s requirements for Windows 11. If you are one of them, you may need to purchase a new PC to get the latest OS.

2. Windows 11 has a lot of bugs

Windows 11 is still fresh out of the oven, and it’s far from being bug-free. Users have reported compatibility issues, missing notifications, and some built-in applications not opening or working as expected. The OS is still missing some features available in Windows 10, and issues are constantly being discovered and fixed, but these are to be expected of any newly released OS. So if you want to stick with a stable and reliable OS, it’s better to wait until Windows 11 is more mature.

3. You can’t access Android apps directly from Windows 11 (yet)

The Your Phone app currently lets Android phone users access mobile apps directly from their Windows 10 PC. This is an especially useful feature for remote and hybrid employees, as the ability to access phone apps on a larger desktop or laptop display and use a mouse, pen, or touchscreen helps with multitasking. If you are one of the people who rely on this feature, you’ll have to wait for the next Windows 11 update to get this functionality.

4. Windows 11 is very similar to Windows 10

Windows 11 wasn’t intended to be a new version of the OS. It was meant to be a substantial update to Windows 10, initially called the Sun Valley Update. That’s why save for a few features, many apps and functions look and work the same in Windows 11 as they do in Windows 10. So unless you’re looking for something radically different from what you have now, it may not be worth upgrading.

5. Microsoft will continue to support Windows 10 until 2025

If you are comfortable with your current setup and don’t have any urgent need to upgrade, you might as well stick with Windows 10. Microsoft has stated that it will continue to support the OS until October 14, 2025. This means that Windows 10 won’t become obsolete in the near future, so you can still enjoy bug fixes, security updates, and new features for this OS version for a few more years.

These are just some of the reasons why you may want to stick with Windows 10. If you decide that upgrading to Windows 11 is right for you, go ahead! But if not, there’s no need to worry — Windows 10 will still be here for a while. Either way, our experts can help you make the most out of your Windows setup. Give us a call today to learn more.

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Windows 11: The basics you need to know

Windows 10 remains the most popular operating system (OS) in the world today. And because it will still be supported until 2025, most users don’t feel the urgency to upgrade to Windows 11. While there’s still plenty of time to upgrade to the latest Microsoft OS, it doesn’t hurt to know what you’re getting into — especially because every Microsoft user will eventually have to use it.

Windows 11 is relatively new to the market, so it’s no surprise that users have plenty of questions about it. From what Windows 11 is to how to install it, here is a list of everything you need to know about the new Microsoft OS.

What makes Windows 11 different from Windows 10?

Microsoft promises to improve its OS with every release, and that’s also the case with Windows 11. It features refined power and security features and redesigned key visual elements that give the OS a more modern look. It is also packed with new tools, apps, and sounds that come together cohesively to give you a refreshing PC experience.

Does Windows 11 take up more PC space than Windows 10?

No. Both versions of Windows require approximately the same amount of disk space. However, you will need extra space in your PC during the upgrade process. After about 10 days upon completing the update, Windows will clean up this extra disk space.

When can I get a PC that comes with pre-installed Windows 11?

Windows 11 is pre-installed on PCs that were available before the end of 2021, as well as on all new 2022 PCs. Older models with Windows 10 will be able to upgrade to Windows 11, given that they meet the minimum hardware specifications necessary to run the latest Microsoft OS.

What are the minimum hardware requirements for Windows 11, and how do I know if my PC meets them?

You can check the complete list of Windows 11 minimum hardware requirements here

To see if your PC meets these specifications, download and run the PC Health Check app. Apart from providing a comprehensive eligibility check for your device and giving information on why your device is or isn’t eligible, it will also tell you what you can do if your device doesn’t meet the minimum specifications. 

Will my current accessories work with Windows 11?

All accessories that work with Windows 10 and meet Windows 11 specifications should have no problems working with Windows 11. To be sure, you can always check with the manufacturers.

If my Windows 10 device meets the minimum requirements, when will I be able to upgrade to Windows 11?

While the Windows 11 rollout is expected to be completed in early 2022, it is already available for most of the devices in use today. But because not all eligible Windows 10 devices will be offered the update at the same time, you should run the PC Health Check app on your device to see if Windows 11 is already available.

What if I want to install Windows 11 on my compatible device but the upgrade isn’t available to me yet?

The good news is that you can install Windows 11 on your eligible PC without waiting for Microsoft to offer the OS to you. From the official Windows 11 download page, simply choose how you’d like to install the update. The best and easiest installation option for most people is via Microsoft installation assistant, but there are also options for installing through a bootable USB, a DVD installer, or a disk image ISO.

What should I do if my PC doesn’t meet the minimum hardware specifications?

If your PC is not eligible for a Windows 11 update, don’t fret. You don’t necessarily have to buy a new PC — at least not yet. You can stay on Windows 10; it remains a great version of Windows and it will be supported until October 14, 2025.

How much is the Windows 11 upgrade?

Upgrading to Windows 11 is free for PCs running the most current version of Windows 10 and have the right hardware specifications. To check if you’re running the latest Windows 10 updates, go to Settings > Windows Update

Note that the free upgrade offer doesn’t have a specific end date, so there’s no saying how long it will last. It is within Microsoft’s right and discretion when to cancel the free offer, but the end date should be no sooner than one year from Windows 11’s general availability.

If I’m eligible for Windows 11 but decline the upgrade, can I upgrade later?

Definitely. You can upgrade anytime by simply going to Settings > Windows Update.

What will happen to my files when I upgrade to Windows 11?

All your data will transfer by default when you install Windows 11. However, it’s recommended that you back up your files first before installation so you can have a copy of these in case anything goes wrong. Learn more about how to back up your data using OneDrive PC folder Backup here.

If I upgrade to Windows 11 but don’t like it, can I go back to Windows 10?

Yes. Within 10 days of installing the Windows 11 upgrade, you can easily return to Windows 10 while keeping your files and data. To do so, go to Start > Settings > System > Recovery, then click on Go Back.

After 10 days, the “Go Back” option will no longer be available, and you will need to back up your data so you can do a clean install of Windows 10.

These are just some of the questions most users ask about Windows 11. If you have any more queries about the latest Microsoft OS, don’t hesitate to give our experts a call.

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How to clean your PC using Disk Cleanup

Over time, your Windows PC accumulates files you no longer need, which can slow down its performance. That’s just how the Windows operating system works. But don’t fret — you can use Windows’ Disk Cleanup tool to get rid of your unnecessary files on your computer, free up your hard drive, and make it run fast again. Here’s how the Disk Cleanup tool does that.

How to run the Disk Cleanup tool

Disk Cleanup can easily be accessed through the Start menu or by searching Disk Cleanup. The tool selects Drive C by default, so make sure to choose the correct drive you want to clean out. Next to each file location is information about how much space it is taking up in your hard disk.

To access this tool on Windows 10, go to the Start menu, scroll to Windows Administrative Tools, then click Disk Cleanup.

Each file location has a corresponding checkbox that needs to be selected in order to delete the unnecessary files it contains. Upon clicking a file location, a description of the files it contains will appear at the bottom of the window so you will see the types of files you’ll be removing.

When Disk Cleanup is finished, you’ll need to restart your system to remove unnecessary Windows Update files. Remember, the Disk Cleanup tool only removes those Update files that are no longer needed, hence usually very few are deleted.

The benefits of Disk Cleanup

Why use Disk Cleanup when you can simply upgrade or replace your hard drive? That’s because doing so offers the following advantages:

  • Maximizes your drive’s memory – The ultimate benefits of cleaning up your disk are maximized computer storage space, increased speed, and improved functionality. These enable you to use your device at peak performance levels.
  • Makes your computer more reliable and secure – Some programs that are downloaded through the internet are often infected with viruses that can decrease your computer’s reliability. The Disk Cleanup tool can clean your computer and rid it of unwanted programs as well.
  • Saves time and increases efficiency – The traditional way of opening folders to find old files to delete may be enough for some, but not for those who prioritize productivity. Although files can be deleted manually, Disk Cleanup is simply much faster.
  • Saves money – Instead of buying and configuring a new drive, you can maximize the useful life of your current one.

The Disk Cleanup tool is as handy to launch and operate as any basic program. If you are looking to further improve the speed of your systems, contact us today to learn more about our IT services.

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Windows 11: Missing features and capabilities

Microsoft’s updated operating system has plenty to offer in terms of features and design. Users will like its virtual desktop creation capabilities, enhanced Microsoft Teams integration, greatly improved security, a more personalized widgets feed, and other new features. But while Windows 11 has plenty to offer, it would have been even better if it came with these capabilities.

Customizable taskbar

In Windows 10, users can move the taskbar from its default horizontal position to the right or left edge or the top of the screen. In Windows 11, the taskbar stays at the bottom and there’s no option to customize its dimensions. Although the taskbar is commonly kept at the bottom of the screen, some users may want to change its position for different reasons.

Additionally, there’s no longer an option to move the Date and Time on the taskbar. In Windows 10, users can move Date and Time, which is placed in the right-hand corner of the taskbar’s System Tray area, by toggling off Clock in Settings. Some users may be perfectly fine with the default taskbar settings, but others might prefer greater customizability.

Drag and drop

Also absent in Windows 11 is the ability to drag and drop a file on your desktop into a program on the taskbar. In Windows 10 and earlier versions, you can drag, say, an Excel document saved on your desktop onto the Excel icon on the taskbar, and it will open. You can’t do this anymore on Windows 11. Users can also no longer drag and drop/save a file or any program onto the taskbar.

Live Tiles

The Start Menu in Windows 11 comes with new features, mainly a refurbished design, the “Pinned” icons, and a “Recommended” section. But gone are Live Tiles, previously available in earlier Windows versions, beginning with Windows 10. Those who’ve updated to Windows 11 will get the new “Widgets” features in place of the Live Tiles, but the latter serves an entirely different function.

Easier activation

To activate Windows 11 Home, users must have a Microsoft account, a 64-bit processor, and an internet connection. These are part of Microsoft’s minimum system requirements to activate the OS — on top of the need for a device with at least 4 GB of memory and 64 GB of storage.

On one hand, this can be useful. For one, business users signing into Windows with their Microsoft account automatically backs up their files through the company’s OneDrive storage device. However, for many users who don’t have a Microsoft account yet, it would be a lot easier not to have to connect a Microsoft account (or create one) when activating Windows 11.

Cortana integration

Cortana is a much less popular counterpart to the more established voice assistants of Apple (Siri), Amazon (Alexa), and Google (Google Assistant). But people who’ve gotten used to Windows’ very own assistant, which is integrated into Windows 10, might feel let down that Cortana is no longer part of the system setup nor can it be found within the Start Menu. Note, however, that the Cortana application is still available. You can find and enable it in Settings > Apps > Apps & Features > Cortana.

Internet Explorer support

To a lesser extent, some Windows 11 users will be disappointed by the absence of Internet Explorer, which will cease to receive support from June 15, 2022 onwards.

Faster shutdown

The slow shutdown of PCs running on Windows 10 is commonly attributed to Windows system files or corrupted drivers. Users would have liked to see faster shutdowns in Windows 11, but alas, that is not the case. Wake-from-sleep and restart times also remain unenhanced.

Windows 11 is not going to please everyone, but its other new functions will nevertheless please others. If you want to maximize all that the new OS has to offer, give our team a call. Our IT professionals would be more than happy to make your new system work for you.

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A little desktop tidiness goes a long way

You may have the habit of putting apps and files that need your immediate attention on your desktop, but not moving them to proper folders when you’re through with them. What you end up with is a mess that makes it hard to find what you need and easy to lose important files forever. Prevent this by following our tips for clearing your desktop.

1. Arrange, sort, and prioritize

Before you delete everything from your desktop, think about what you really want to keep. This will vary from person to person, but most people use their desktop for storing files, folders, and apps that they want to access quickly.

Take the time to sort your files and folders. An easy way to do this is to right-click on an empty area of your desktop (where there are no icons), mouse over on View, and select Auto arrange icons. This will organize your icons into a grid format. Then, right-click on the empty space and hover your mouse over Sort by and select Date modified to arrange the icons by the date they were last opened, with the latest on top.

2. Create a folder for holding files and another for keeping app shortcuts

People often use their desktop to store downloaded files, photos, screenshots, and even email attachments, which can lead to a messy desktop.

However, you don’t need all these on your desktop. Instead, create a folder on your desktop that will serve as your dumping ground for all your nonessential files and folders. If you don’t intend to keep a file, icon, photo, etc. for long, put it in this folder. Revisit this folder every once in a while to delete the files you no longer need.

It also helps if you create a shortcut folder. When you install new programs on Windows, a shortcut icon is often automatically added to your desktop. But these desktop shortcuts should be for frequently used programs only. Create a separate folder for programs that aren’t used that often.

3. Clear out unnecessary files

Once you have your folders set up, it’s time to get rid of the clutter. If you haven’t used a file, folder, etc. in the past two months or so, get rid of it. Examine your desktop and uninstall programs you no longer use. You’ll also want to delete outdated files you no longer need and place the rest in relevant folders.

4. Use the taskbar or Start menu for apps

In Windows 10, you can pin apps to the Start menu and the taskbar. This is a great alternative to having program shortcuts on your desktop. To pin apps, open your apps list (i.e., click the Start button at the bottom-left corner of the screen) and right-click on the application you would like to pin. Select Pin to Start or Pin to taskbar for the option you want.

5. Choose a wallpaper you love looking at

An interesting way to minimize clutter is to pick a wallpaper that you enjoy looking at — whether it’s your favorite motivational quote, a photo of your family, or a picture of your dream house, car, or destination. Having an image you like serves as a reminder to keep icons to a minimum, so if you can’t see the image anymore, then you have too many icons, and it may be time to get rid of a few.

If you are looking to learn more about how to use Windows more effectively, contact us today.

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Windows 10: Boost your PC’s performance with these tips

Windows 10 has a lot of special features that aim to improve your computing experience. Unfortunately, many of these may also slow your PC down, especially if your machine is older or has a low-end processor. We’ve listed four effective tweaks to make your Windows 10 computer faster.

Prevent programs from launching at startup

Windows makes certain programs readily available by loading them at startup. While Microsoft likely has good intentions for doing this, this auto-launch feature slows down your computer. To fix this issue, you’ll need to adjust your settings.

Open the Task Manager by pressing Ctrl+Shift+Esc. On the Startup tab, select a program you don’t want launching at startup — such as a media player or an optional accessory that doesn’t have to be active all the time — then click Disable. To be on the safe side, however, keep essential apps such as antivirus software enabled.

Get rid of useless applications

Having too many programs installed on your computer uses up valuable memory and hard disk space. This slows down your machine and makes it work harder than necessary. Quickly uninstall programs you don’t need by following these steps:

  • Tap the Windows key on your keyboard and type “Add or remove programs” in the search bar. Selecting the first result opens a System settings window.
  • Under Apps & features, you will see all the apps stored on your computer.
  • Select the program/s you no longer want, and click Uninstall.

You’ll then be guided through several steps to complete the uninstallation process.

Organize your disks

It’s important to regularly clean out your computer of data you don’t need. Thankfully, Microsoft’s Disk Cleanup tool makes it easy to do so.

To find the tool, tap on the Windows button on your keyboard and type “Disk Cleanup.” If you click on the first result, the tool will launch and automatically find files that take up too much memory space, such as temporary internet and system memory dump files. Make sure that the checkbox before each option is selected, then click OK to send these files to your Recycle Bin.

Turn off apps running in the background

You may not know it, but there are a lot of programs that run in the background as you use your computer. Even when you’re not actively using them, these apps run in the background so they can receive information, send notifications, and download and install updates. However, they also slow down your CPU. Disabling these apps will reduce the burden on your computer and speed it up.

To find out what programs are running in the background, press the Windows button on your keyboard, type “Background apps,” and hit Enter. Find the programs you don’t need running and toggle the On-Off button.

By following these four steps, you’ll see a noticeable difference in your PC speed. If you want to learn how to optimize your Windows system further or need assistance with other Microsoft products, give us a call.

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Windows 10: Boost your PC’s performance with these tips

Windows 10 has a lot of special features that aim to improve your computing experience. Unfortunately, many of these may also slow your PC down, especially if your machine is older or has a low-end processor. We’ve listed four effective tweaks to make your Windows 10 computer faster.

Prevent programs from launching at startup

Windows makes certain programs readily available by loading them at startup. While Microsoft likely has good intentions for doing this, this auto-launch feature slows down your computer. To fix this issue, you’ll need to adjust your settings.

Open the Task Manager by pressing Ctrl+Shift+Esc. On the Startup tab, select a program you don’t want launching at startup — such as a media player or an optional accessory that doesn’t have to be active all the time — then click Disable. To be on the safe side, however, keep essential apps such as antivirus software enabled.

Get rid of useless applications

Having too many programs installed on your computer uses up valuable memory and hard disk space. This slows down your machine and makes it work harder than necessary. Quickly uninstall programs you don’t need by following these steps:

  • Tap the Windows key on your keyboard and type “Add or remove programs” in the search bar. Selecting the first result opens a System settings window.
  • Under Apps & features, you will see all the apps stored on your computer.
  • Select the program/s you no longer want, and click Uninstall.

You’ll then be guided through several steps to complete the uninstallation process.

Organize your disks

It’s important to regularly clean out your computer of data you don’t need. Thankfully, Microsoft’s Disk Cleanup tool makes it easy to do so.

To find the tool, tap on the Windows button on your keyboard and type “Disk Cleanup.” If you click on the first result, the tool will launch and automatically find files that take up too much memory space, such as temporary internet and system memory dump files. Make sure that the checkbox before each option is selected, then click OK to send these files to your Recycle Bin.

Turn off apps running in the background

You may not know it, but there are a lot of programs that run in the background as you use your computer. Even when you’re not actively using them, these apps run in the background so they can receive information, send notifications, and download and install updates. However, they also slow down your CPU. Disabling these apps will reduce the burden on your computer and speed it up.

To find out what programs are running in the background, press the Windows button on your keyboard, type “Background apps,” and hit Enter. Find the programs you don’t need running and toggle the On-Off button.

By following these four steps, you’ll see a noticeable difference in your PC speed. If you want to learn how to optimize your Windows system further or need assistance with other Microsoft products, give us a call.

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Windows 10 privacy settings you should adjust right now

Default privacy settings on devices usually aren’t very private. Even Windows 10 devices are initially configured to collect information about users, like how and where they use their devices as well as what type of content and data they access. Fortunately, there are ways to lock down your privacy in Windows 10 — just follow these tips.

Turn personalized advertising off

Windows 10 assigns each user an “advertising ID” that is used for ad personalization based on your recent browsing history. If you’d rather see generic ads targeted to you based on demographics rather than your ID, we recommend turning this feature off. Here’s how to do it:

  1. Click on the search box at the bottom left of your screen. If your search bar is hidden, right-click the taskbar and select Search > Show search box.
  2. Next, type in “Privacy,” then click on Privacy Settings and select General.
  3. Turn off the option that states “Let apps use advertising ID to make ads more interesting to you based on your app activity.”
  4. Lastly, open your web browser and go to this link. Once there, turn off the “Personalized ads wherever I use my Microsoft account” and “Personalized ads in this browser” options.

Following these steps resets your ad ID, letting you surf the web without targeted advertisements.

Disable Cortana

Voice-controlled digital assistants have become big business. Microsoft aims to capitalize on this market with Cortana, an incredibly resourceful built-in assistant that allows you to quickly set reminders, schedule events, and send emails, among many other intuitive features. However, the way it uses the information it collects can become overbearing at times. Here’s how to disable Cortana:

  1. Type “Task Manager” in the search box, or use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl + Shift + Esc.
  2. In Task Manager, click the Startup tab and find Cortana in the list of programs.
  3. Right-click the row and click Disable.
  4. Open the Start menu, then find Cortana under All Apps.
  5. Right-click on Cortana, select More, and click on App settings.
  6. Toggle the switch under “Runs at log-in.”

Once disabled, the Cortana option disappears and you’re now left with just a search bar, which you can use to search for things online or on your desktop.

Stop peer-to-peer file sharing

With peer-to-peer or P2P file sharing enabled, Windows 10 shares downloaded updates to your PC with other Windows 10 users in the same network by default. This helps other users update their systems faster and speeds up your upgrade downloads. However, if you are unhappy with your files being used by other users, you can turn P2P sharing off.

  1. Click the Windows icon and head over to Settings.
  2. Click on Update and Security then choose Delivery Optimization from the sidebar.
  3. Under “Allow downloads from other PCs,” switch the toggle to “Off.”

If you want to share your files with PCs on your in-house network only, leave this option on and select the option that says “PCs on my local network.” For more detailed instructions on how to stop P2P updates, click here.

Blunt Microsoft’s Edge

Microsoft Edge is chock-full of features — such as Cortana Integration and typing prediction — that send data back to Microsoft. To turn off these intrusive functionalities, open Edge and click on the three dots in the far right corner.

Then, click on Settings > Cookies and site permissions. There you have the option to disable a bunch of settings, such as those related to ads, automatic downloads, and location sharing.

These simple security tips will stop Microsoft from tracking your online activities for good. Don’t hesitate to contact us today for all matters security-related.

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